Online Summer Classes

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SESSION I : May 16 - June 17, 2022

SESSION II : June 20 - July 22, 2022

 

View all available classes below:

SESSION I

CORR 310 Research Methods:

Research methodologies as they apply to correctional evidence-based practices are covered, as are strengths and limitations of various research practices, especially with respect to central correctional concepts such as risk, recidivism, and program evaluation. Students will gain experience with data sources, data collection, and basic interpretation of data analysis.
Prerequisites: none

CORR 442/542 Criminology:

A critical consideration of myths concerning crime, perspectives on crime and their assumptions, current criminology theory, and construction of alternative explanations related to crime.
Prerequisites: SOC 101

CORR 485/585 Community Re-entry:

Topics vary as announced in class schedule. May be retaken for credit if topic varies.
 

Session II

CORR 441 Social Deviance:

Sociological perspective on social deviance; overview of theoretical approaches; emphasis on symbolic interactionism; issues of social control; research examples and policy implications. Prerequisites: SOC 101

CORR 472 Drugs and Society:

A sociological perspective to examine the history of drug use and abuse in the United States. Multicultural issues in drug abuse, international drug distribution networks, prevention efforts, and legal issues will be discussed.
Prerequisites: none | Diverse Cultures: Purple

Session I

ANTH 269 Anthropology of Sex:

Sex and our relationship with it. This course examines the topics of sex, sexuality, and gender by exploring the diverse range of sexual cultures of the world in the past and the present. Attention is given to the role of language, biology, culture, and the archeological record of societies’ fascination with sex.

Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-07 | Diverse Cultures: Purple

SESSION II

ANTH 101 Intro to Anthro:

This course surveys human biological and cultural diversity through time and space. You will learn about questions like: "how did humans evolve?" and "how do anthropologists collect and interpret information about human beings and their ancestors?"

Goal Areas 5 and 8 | Diverse Cultures: Purple

SEssion I

CORR 310 Research Methods:

Research methodologies as they apply to correctional evidence-based practices are covered, as are strengths and limitations of various research practices, especially with respect to central correctional concepts such as risk, recidivism, and program evaluation. Students will gain experience with data sources, data collection, and basic interpretation of data analysis.
Prerequisites: none

CORR 442/542 Criminology:

A critical consideration of myths concerning crime, perspectives on crime and their assumptions, current criminology theory, and construction of alternative explanations related to crime.
Prerequisites: SOC 101

CORR 485/585 Community Re-entry:

Topics vary as announced in class schedule. May be retaken for credit if topic varies.

 

SESSION II

CORR 441 Social Deviance:

Sociological perspective on social deviance; overview of theoretical approaches; emphasis on symbolic interactionism; issues of social control; research examples and policy implications.
Prerequisites: SOC 101

CORR 472 Drugs and Society:

A sociological perspective to examine the history of drug use and abuse in the United States. Multicultural issues in drug abuse, international drug distribution networks, prevention efforts, and legal issues will be discussed.
Prerequisites: none | Diverse Cultures: Purple

Session I

CJ 201 Criminal Justice Careers:

This course will introduce students to the numerous agencies and organizations that make up the criminal justice system and its components. A primary goal for this course is to help students prepare for, as well as succeed in, a criminal justice system career.
Prerequisites: none

CJ 255 Juvenile Delinquency (Short course 5/16-5/27):

A critical consideration of definitions of juvenile delinquency, emphasis on micro and macro level of struggle in which delinquent behavior takes place, critique of current theories on delinquency, and the juvenile justice response to delinquency.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-5, GE-9 | Diverse Cultures: Purple
 

SESSION II

CJ 201 Criminal Justice Careers:

This course will introduce students to the numerous agencies and organizations that make up the criminal justice system and its components. A primary goal for this course is to help students prepare for, as well as succeed in, a criminal justice system career.
Prerequisites: none

SESSION I & II

ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics:

Emphasis on forces influencing employment and inflation. Current problems of the economy are stressed along with tools government has to cope with them.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-05

ECON 202 Principles of Microeconomics:

Examines decision making by the individual firm, the determination of prices and wages, and current problems facing business firms.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-05

ECON 207 Business Statistics:

Basic statistical methods including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, probability distributions, sampling, problems of estimation and hypothesis testing in the case of one and two sample means and proportions. Chi-Square, one-way analysis of variance, simple regression and correlation analysis, and brief introduction to multiple regression analysis. Use of computer statistical packages required.
Prerequisites: MATH 112 or equivalent | Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-04

SESSION I

ETHN 100 American Racial Minority:

A study of American racial/ethnic minorities, especially the histories of Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans. Their roles and contributions to American society will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-07 | Diverse Cultures: Purple

ETHN 101 Intro Multicultural/Ethnic Studies:

This course introduces students to multicultural and ethnic knowledge and values in and outside the United States. Students are exposed to such issues as race, culture, ethnicity, dominance, immigration, stereotypes, discrimination, and intergroup relations through interdisciplinary approaches-anthropological, economic, historical, political, psychological and/or sociological.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-07 | Diverse Cultures: Purple

ETHN 220W Civil Rights in the U.S.

This course will focus on the struggle for civil rights by diverse groups in the United States. Emphasis will be on how these struggles have impacted their communities and cultural pluralism in the U.S.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-05 | Diverse Cultures: Purple | Writing Intensive

ETHN 470/570 Women of Color:

Examines the effects of sexism and racism on women of color and provides an understanding of the significant contributions they have made in their struggle against oppression.
Diverse Cultures: Purple
 

SESSION II

ETHN 220W Civil Rights in the U.S.:

This course will focus on the struggle for civil rights by diverse groups in the United States. Emphasis will be on how these struggles have impacted their communities and cultural pluralism in the U.S.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-05 | Diverse Cultures: Purple | Writing Intensive

ETHN 410/510 Foundation of Oppression:

Students will examine the forces which create and maintain prejudice, discrimination and racism within global perspectives. Special attention will be given to the work of Paulo Freire.
Prerequisites: ETHN 100 or ATHN 400  | Diverse Cultures: Purple

ETHN 420/520 African American Studies:

This course will provide students with an in-depth examination of the issues affecting present-day Africans, and those of the Black Diaspora. Possible topics are fair representation in the media, education, cross-cultural interactions, economics, politics/law, and racial identity.
Prerequisites: ETHN 110 or ETHN 400 or consent

SESSION I

GWS 110 Intro to Gender:

This course familiarizes students with the field of Gender and Women's Studies. It focuses on major questions and approaches to understanding gender alongside race, class, and sexuality, among other identity categories.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-07 | Diverse Cultures: Purple

GWS 120W Violence & Gender:

Students will examine the gendered and systematic nature of violence. Special attention will be given to the ways in which violence against women is perpetuated through interpersonal relationships and through institutions such as schools, the judicial system, welfare policies. The effects of internalized oppressions, such as internalized sexism, racism, and homophobia will be discussed. Emphasis on feminist analysis and building skills for educating ourselves and others about constructing non-violent cultures.
Goal Areas: GE-09 | Writing Intensive

GWS 220W Sex and Gender Worldwide:

This course will examine women's lives and activism, past and present, throughout the world. We will explore and evaluate individual and collective efforts to achieve social justice in the context of interlocking systems of oppression. Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-08, GE-09 | Diverse Cultures: Purple
 

SESSION II

GWS 120 Violence & Gender:

Students will examine the gendered and systematic nature of violence. Special attention will be given to the ways in which violence against women is perpetuated through interpersonal relationships and through institutions such as schools, the judicial system, welfare policies. The effects of internalized oppressions, such as internalized sexism, racism, and homophobia will be discussed. Emphasis on feminist analysis and building skills for educating ourselves and others about constructing non-violent cultures.
Goal Areas: GE-09

GWS 220W Sex and Gender Worldwide:

This course will examine women's lives and activism, past and present, throughout the world. We will explore and evaluate individual and collective efforts to achieve social justice in the context of interlocking systems of oppression. Fall, Spring, Summer
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-08, GE-09 | Diverse Cultures: Purple | Writing Intensive

SESSion I

GEOG 100 Elements of Geography:

An introduction to Geography and its themes of study. The course will familiarize students with where places are located in the world together with their cultural and physical features. Students will be tasked to think critically and diversely about various cultures and features of the modern world.
Goal Areas: GE-08, GE-10 | Diverse Cultures: Purple

GEOG 101 Intro Physical Geography:

An introduction to the science of understanding earth's physical environment, with focus on the processes that drive fundamental earth systems. Includes investigation of natural hazards, earth-sun relationships, climate and climate change, weather, flora and fauna, soil, landforms, and surfaces processes driven by rivers, glaciers, wind, rock decay, gravity. North American and world-wide examples are used to demonstrate spatial distribution and interrelationships. Some coverage of human-environmental relations.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-03, GE-10

GEOG 103 Intro Cultural Geography:

Cultural aspects of interactions between people and their environment focusing on spatial patterns of population, agriculture, politics, language, religion, industrialization, and urbanization. Emphasis is placed on the processes that create the cultural landscape and on management of land and natural resources.
Prerequisites: none  | Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-08 | Diverse Cultures: Purple

 

SESSIon II

GEOG 100 Elements of Geography:

An introduction to Geography and its themes of study. The course will familiarize students with where places are located in the world together with their cultural and physical features. Students will be tasked to think critically and diversely about various cultures and features of the modern world.
Goal Areas: GE-08, GE-10 | Diverse Cultures: Purple

GEOG 101 Intro Physical Geography:

An introduction to the science of understanding earth's physical environment, with focus on the processes that drive fundamental earth systems. Includes investigation of natural hazards, earth-sun relationships, climate and climate change, weather, flora and fauna, soil, landforms, and surfaces processes driven by rivers, glaciers, wind, rock decay, gravity. North American and world-wide examples are used to demonstrate spatial distribution and interrelationships. Some coverage of human-environmental relations.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-03, GE-10

SESSION I

HIST 170W Ancient World Civilization:

A history of the physical, political, cultural, social, and economic foundations of world civilizations to 1500. Same content as HIST 170. Students may not take both HIST 170 and HIST 170W for credit.
Writing intensive

HIST 191 U.S. Since 1877:

A survey of American History from the end of Reconstruction to the present with a special emphasis on political and social developments.
Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-07 | Diverse Cultures: Purple

HIST 432/532 African In/Out of Hollywood:

This seminar course will deal with a specific aspect of World History as announced by the department.
 

SESSION II

HIST 171W World Civil, 1500-Present:

Review of major changes in World Civilization since 1500. Same content as HIST 171. Students may not take both HIST 171 and HIST 171W for credit.
Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-08 | Writing Intensive

HIST 190 United States to 1877:

This course is designed to provide an overview of America's political, social, economic, and cultural development from earliest colonization to 1877.
Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-07 | Diverse Cultures: Purple

HIST 302 World Hist: An Overview:

Review of World History as a field of study.
Prerequisites: none

HIST 435/535 East Asian Hist: 1945-Pre:

A comparative history of the rise of the Chinese and Japanese nations from 1945 to the present.
Prerequisites: none | Diverse Cultures: Purple

HIST 446/546 Mod Mid East:

How do we define the Middle East? In our popular culture and media sources that we are exposed to daily, the Middle East is one of the more discussed and yet, one of the most misunderstood topics. Our goal is to both to unlearn misconceptions and to create an accurate representation of the region. Our class will start with an introduction to the region and its history and the misconceptions that are attached to it. It will then proceed from the late 18th century to the revolutionary events of recent years dubbed the Arab Spring and their aftermaths.
Prerequisites: none

HIST 490 Teaching American Democracy (6/20-6/24):

Specific titles to be announced in departmental course descriptions. P/N only.

SESSIOn II

POL 470/570 Food Politics:

This course explores topics in political institutions and process beyond what is covered in the existing curriculum. Students study specialized topics of current importance in the field. Specific topics will change depending on the term and instructor. May be retaken with a change of topic.
Prerequisites: none

Session I

PSYC 101 Intro to Psych Science:

This course is designed to provide a thorough introduction to the broad spectrum of theories and applications that make up the field of psychology
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-05

PSYC 201 Statistics for Psychology:

This course emphasizes understanding the conceptual basis of common statistical procedures and applying those procedures to the problems of organizing information and making inferences from data. Topics include: summarizing data, the logic of inference, estimation, analysis of variance, and correlation.
Prerequisites: Complete one course: MATH 112, MATH 113, MATH 115, MATH 121, MATH 130, or STAT 154

PSYC 206 Inro to Cog Science:

This course introduces a multidisciplinary approach to the scientific study of cognition. Contributions from the fields of biology, computer science, neuroscience, philosophy, and psychology are emphasized. Topics include the mind-body problem, perception, memory, linguistics, problem solving, artificial intelligence, and robotics. This course is a prerequisite for the cognitive science major. For the psychology major, it serves as unrestricted elective credit; it does not satisfy the cognitive restricted elective requirement.
Goal Areas: GE-05

PSYC 230 Child Care Psychology:

This course is designed to develop an understanding of major variables that impact the psychological development of children. Emphasis will be placed on what parents and other care givers can do to maximize the healthy psychological development of their children.
Diverse Cultures: Gold

PSYC 340 Intro to Social Psychology:

An exploration of theories and research related to the ways that the social environment affects people's behavior.
Prerequisites: PSYC 101

PSYC 343 Intro to Develop Psychology:

This course examines changes in human behavior over the entire lifespan from conception to death. Topics cover developmental changes in physical, cognitive, and social domains. Traditional theories are integrated with current findings of developmental researchers.
Prerequisites: PSYC 101

PSYCH 409/509 History and Systems:

Examination of the historical origins of the principal contemporary psychological theories.

PSYC 415/515 Human Memory:

This course covers experimental and behavioral studies of human memory including long-and short-term memory, memory for text, pictures, spatial information, and autobiographical events. Emphasis on real-world situations, including education, in which memory and learning play a role.
Prerequisites: PSYC 211W

PSYC 433/533 Child Psychology:

Physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and personality development from conception to preadolescence. Focus on interplay between maturation and experience.
Prerequisites: PSYC 101

PSYC 455/555 Abnormal Psychology:

This course is designed to increase the student's awareness and understanding of abnormal psychology. Students will become familiar with clinical descriptions, course of onset, and treatment regimens specific to various disorders.
Prerequisites: PSYC 101
 

SESSION II

PSY 101 Intro to Psych Sciences:

This course is designed to provide a thorough introduction to the broad spectrum of theories and applications that make up the field of psychology
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-05

PSYC 103W Psychology Today:

Introduces students to major issues in society that impact their lives, behaviors, and the way they think. Course requires student to critically address controversial and non-controversial issues through clear argumentations, intensive writings, research and presentations.
Goal Areas: GE-02 | Writing Intensive

PSYC 211W Research Methods & Design:

An introduction to the major components of research methodology in psychology. This is a writing intensive course and involves the processing, interpretation, and exposition of behavioral data.
Prerequisites: Must have a minimum total cumulative GPA of 2.70 or instructor permission to enroll; PSYC 201| Writing Intensive

PSYC 321 Intro to Brain and Behavior:

This course will introduce students to the relationship between the structure and function of the nervous system to the underlying biological processes of behavior.
Prerequisites: PSYC 201

PSYC 340 Intro to Social Psychology:

An exploration of theories and research related to the ways that the social environment affects people's behavior.
Prerequisites: PSYC 101

PSYC 414/514 Learning:

This course provides a broad overview and analysis of the major theories of human and animal learning.
Prerequisites: PSYC 101

PSYC 436/536 Adolescent Psychology:

This class covers the development of the individual from the age of 11 to 19 years of age. Discussion will include aspects of both normal and abnormal development.
Prerequisites: none

SESSion I

SOC 101 Intro to Sociology:

Overview of the nature and characteristics of human societies; the structure and processes of social life; impact of social forces on individuals and groups; interdependence of society and the individual; emphasis on cultural diversity and globalism.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-08 | Diverse Cultures: Purple

SOC 351 Social Psychology:

The study of symbolic interaction as the basis of the mind, the self, and society.
Prerequisites: none

SOC409/509 Family Violence:

Various forms of family violence including dating violence, spouse abuse, and child abuse; social theory, empirical research and social policy on family violence; social context, responses and solutions.
 

SESSION II

SOC. 202 Intro Social Statistics:

Basic descriptive and inferential statistics used in the analysis of sociological data.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-04

SOC.  307 Sex & Gender Contemporary Sociology:

Description and analysis of sex/gender systems, interpersonal power, language and communication, the role of gender in social institutions such as the family, work, and politics, and the role of social movements in creating change in gender relations.

SOC. 425/525 Social Movements:

Survey of major sociological perspectives on social movements, including theoretical approaches and empirical research on the causes, processes, and outcomes of social movements.

SOC 446/546 Race, Culture & Ethnicity:

Study of minority racial and cultural groups in U.S. society. An examination of how the lives of the members of these groups are affected by racism, prejudice, and discrimination.

SOC 466/566 Program Planning & Eval:

This course will address theoretical and practical aspects of the planning and evaluation process within social service systems. Evidence-based methods of developing programs and measuring their effectiveness in the human services will be addressed.

SESSION I

URBS 100 Intro to the City:

A fresh look at the city, with emphasis on the reasons why cities have grown and how people can make cities livable.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-08

URBS 110 The City: Design & Arch:

Appreciation of the city as the highest cultural achievement in design and architecture.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-06

URBS 230W Community Leadership:

Introduction to community leadership-elected, professional, or voluntary-and the skills and values which support it.
Prerequisites: none | Goal Areas: GE-09, GE-11 | Writing Intensive

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