International Relations Minor

Program Requirements

Core

An introduction to the dynamics of interactions among sovereign states and other global actors.

Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to acquaint undergraduates with the data and methods of comparative politics. Approaches to the study of comparative politics may include country studies, regional studies, global surveys focusing on specific policy areas or other issues, and general comparative theory.

Prerequisites: none

An advanced theoretical survey of the dynamics of politics and political change at the global level.

Prerequisites: POL 231

Comparative Politics - Choose 4 Credit(s).

This course explores the interaction of the three complex contemporary political and socioeconomic phenomena: the continuing expansion of global capitalism, the rise of nationalism(s), and the new wave of democratization around the world. The following topics are covered and discussed in class, with references to specific country and regional examples, (1) the impact of international economic institutions and democratization, (2) new forms of political participation in emerging democracies, (3) cultural and ethnic determinants of democratization, (4) problems of economic inequality in new democracies, (5) social and gender issues of democratic transitions, and (6) the relationship between democratic expansion and world peace. Course format will be lecture, discussion, student presentations and occasional films.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course offers a cross-national perspective on the politics of social policy and the welfare state in industrialized parts of the world, including North and South America and different regions of Europe. It also explores distinct national patterns of public policy solutions to the common contemporary problems of social security, poverty, and health care by paying close attention to both domestic factors and the forces of globalization that work to constrain government decisions. This multidimensional approach is designed to enable students to better understand how politics work in different ways to produce collective or social choices.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course explores topics in comparative politics beyond what is covered in the existing curriculum. Students study specialized topics of current importance in the field. Specific topics will change depending on the term and instructor. May be retaken with a change of topic.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course focuses on the Russian political system in relation to domestic social and economic environments and also on the role of Russia as a global actor. It examines the post communist transformation in Russia and other former Soviet republics.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course introduces students to the governments and politics of the South Asian countries. The historical and cultural context of politics are explored, as well as contemporary issues.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This class explores the dynamics that determine politics and effect change in the region. Using a comparative perspective for the major countries in the region, we examine such issues as Islam, nationalism, resources, regional conflicts, impact of the international system, and political development.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course includes a detailed analysis of select countries and theoretical concerns in Latin American studies. Its general goal is to provide students with the knowledge of Latin American politics and societies in both regional and comparative contexts.

Prerequisites: POL 241

Survey of the political processes, governmental institutions and policies of the countries of the Asian Pacific Rim, with special emphasis on China, Japan and the newly industrializing states of Southeast Asia.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course is designed to acquaint undergraduate and graduate students with key concepts and issues in the study of African politics. The historical and cultural context of politics is explored, as well as topics of current importance in the field.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course discusses government institutions, political developments, and policymaking structures of contemporary Europe, including the former communist countries of East/Central Europe and the Balkans. It will also cover the ongoing process of European integration (European Union) and democratization of the former Soviet bloc countries. Some of the topics covered will include: elections, party systems, federalism and devolution, ethnic and minority policy, social policy, economic reforms, gender and politics, and cross-Atlantic relations with the US.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course introduces students to key issues and concepts in the study of political and economic development. Both theoretical approaches and empirical data are presented. The course is also designed to enhance students' analytical and research skills.

Prerequisites: POL 241

Restricted Electives

Choose 3 Credit(s).

The variability and universality of human religious expression are explored in specific cross-cultural contexts.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Cross-cultural examination of healing traditions, health beliefs and the impact of social, economic and political factors on the health of peoples in different cultures around the world and among diverse ethnic groups within culturally plural societies, including the United States.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

The contemporary peoples and cultures of Mexico and Central and South America. Emphasis is on cultural patterns and contemporary issues of the region.

Prerequisites: ANTH 101, ANTH 230, or consent 

A pivotal moment in cultural development is when city-states and nations arrive to change the structure of a cultural group. This course has varying topics to present each cultural area in its unique context. May be repeated with different topic.

Prerequisites: none

This course allows faculty the flexibility to consider the challenges of new developments in anthropology. Content will vary from one course to the next. Students may take the course, with the permission of the instructor, more than one time.

Prerequisites: none

Introduction to art and architecture of Western Europe, the Byzantine Empire, and the Islamic world, from the second to the fifteenth centuries. Examination of representative works of art and major styles of Christian, Jewish, and Islamic cultures, including the Romanesque and Gothic periods.

Prerequisites: ART 260 or consent

Historical survey of the representation of gender with comparison of the artistic efforts of males and females and examination of art used to present gender-based issues including homosexuality, feminism, censorship and pornography.

Prerequisites: ART 261 or consent 

Origins and development of Northern and Italian Renaissance art and architecture as an expression of historical, cultural and religious issues.

Prerequisites: ART 261 or consent 

Historical survey of art, architecture and urban planning in Europe and America from the late sixteenth to mid-nineteenth century: Mannerism, Baroque, Rococo, Neoclassicism and Romanticism.

Prerequisites: ART 261 or consent 

Historical survey of art, architecture and urban planning in Europe and America from the mid-nineteenth century to the present: Realism, Impressionism, Expressionism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Op Art, Pop Art, and Post-modern issues and trends.

Prerequisites: ART 261 or consent 

Historical survey of art and architectural developments from Islam's origins through the twentieth century. Course focuses on contextualizing monuments, paintings, and other arts from various regions around the world.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Historical survey of the art and architecture of China, India, Korea and Japan from pre-history to the 20th century.

Prerequisites: ART 260, ART 261 or consent 

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Specific problems in art emphasizing both individual research and contributions to the seminar group on advanced, in-depth topics.

Prerequisites: Consent 

Legal aspects of United States global trade policies, regulation of imports, contracting in the global marketplace, international marketing concerns, structure of various international organizations and treaties. Legal aspects of international licensing and technology, transfers risks of nationalization and expropriation, international dispute resolution, comity, the Act of State, and sovereign immunity doctrines.

Prerequisites: BLAW 200 

The economic rationale for interregional trade: emphasis on current problems.

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202 

Economic underdevelopment and the relationships between mature economies and developing nations.

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202 

Topics on themes, issues, and developments in genres of the literatures of the world. Content changes. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

A study of selected novels from a variety of time periods and cultures, including Eastern and Western Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

Prerequisites: none

Social, political, and economic trends in contemporary France. Prereq: FREN 201, 202, or equivalent

Prerequisites: FREN 201, FREN 202, or equivalent 

A beginning literature course designed to teach students to read with understanding and critical ability. Prereq: FREN 201, 202, or equivalent

Prerequisites: FREN 201, FREN 202, or equivalent 

Study of current vocabulary, terminology and practices used in the business world. Study of developments affecting the French business, industrial and agricultural communities. Prereq: FREN 201, 202, or equivalent

Prerequisites: FREN 201, FREN 202, or equivalent 

Study of France's position in the European Economic Community and of the development of French business law with emphasis on the obligations and rights of business people, the classification and organization of the various types of companies, the emission of contracts and other documents. Prereq: FREN 201, 202, or equivalent

Prerequisites: FREN 201, FREN 202, or equivalent 

A study of the major authors, works and movements of two successive centuries of French literature. Prereq: FREN 201, 202, or equivalent

Prerequisites: FREN 201, FREN 202, or equivalent 

Differences and similarities in the cultural and natural environments by the world's major regions. Useful survey of world geography for educators and international relations students

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

The instructor will develop a specific course on a geographic topic, such as soils, landforms, water resources, energy, housing, population geography, or some other topic for the class.

Prerequisites: none

Examines national and international economic geographical order and trade activities. Topics include economic development, competition, international trade, and impacts on the environment and people.

Prerequisites: none

Spatial problems and structure of governments, focusing on countries of the world and their geographic internal order. Covers such topics as boundary problems, strategic locations, and geopolitical explanations of international and internal relations and conflicts.

Prerequisites: none

Regional geography covering the ecological and human environment of Middle and South America, including the Caribbean. Students can pick specific topics to study in detail. The geographic relations between the USA and Latin America are also covered.

Prerequisites: none

Students will develop a knowledge of the environmental, cultural, historical, and economic geographies of Canada. Readings of bestselling fiction and scholarly works written by Canadians will provide a Canadian perspective on the nation's past, present, and future.

Prerequisites: none

Cultural, environmental, and economic background of Europe west of Russia and Ukraine. Following a general geographic survey, the course will cover major regions and countries.

Prerequisites: none

Examines the physical and human environments of eastern Asia, mainly China, Korea and Japan. The class will be assisted by visual sources and hands-on use of primary documents.

Prerequisites: none

Topics vary and course may be repeated if a different topic/genre is the focus. Major writers from German speaking countries. Genres include novel, poetry, theatre, short story, etc. Prereq: completion of readings 302 or equivalent

Prerequisites: Completion of readings GER 302 or equivalent

The course explores 20th and 21st century German film in historical, social, cultural contexts and events. Topics may be a survey, or concentration on Weimar Cinema, New German Cinema, East German Cinema, transnational cinema. Topics vary. Course may be repeated.

Prerequisites: none

Review of World History as a field of study.

Prerequisites: none

A history of western monotheistic religions and their interactions with the secular world and each other from the beginnings of Judaism to the Crusades.

Prerequisites: none

Political, social and economic development of England and Great Britain since the death of Elizabeth I.

Prerequisites: none

Review of French history from the Revolution of 1789 to the present, including such topics as origins and course of the Revolution, Napoleon, Louis XVIII to Third Republic, World War I, World War II and France since 1945.

Prerequisites: none

Political, economic, social, cultural, and immigration history of the Scandinavian countries, including major themes in the mass migration and history of Scandinavians in America. Emphasis on the period, 1500-present.

Prerequisites: none

This seminar course will deal with a specific aspect of European history as announced by the department.

Prerequisites: none

A comparative history of the Chinese and Japanese nations from the 19th century to 1945.

Prerequisites: none

A comparative history of the rise of the Chinese and Japanese nations from 1945 to the present.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

History of relations of major East Asian countries with the United States from the late 18th century to the present.

Prerequisites: none

Investigation of historical developments across the African continent from pre-history through the eighteenth century. Topics will include ancient empires of West Africa, the Swahili coast, the spread of Islam, the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the formation of South Africa's multi-racial society.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Investigation of historical developments in Sub-Saharan Africa during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics will include trade with Europe and America, European colonization and African resistance, life in colonial Africa, independence movements, South Africa's apartheid state and the Rwanda genocide.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

This course traces the history of Latin America from the late colonial period through the present as the various countries in the region attempted to transcend their colonial past and confront the pressures of modernization and globalization.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

An examination of the major factors influencing U.S. diplomacy since 1900. Students will examine how influential policy makers defined their diplomatic goals, and how both domestic and external factors have contributed to America's reaction to wars and revolutions around the world.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

This course will discuss slavery and emancipation in the Atlantic World (Africa, Latin America, and the United States). Students will discover how slavery and emancipation differed in different regions and over time.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

This course will examine the Vietnam War. Students will discover how and why the U.S. became involved in Vietnam, examine the specific problems faced by American diplomats and military officials, and how the war affected American society.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

International dimensions of business: global business environment (economic, cultural, legal, political) and international business functions (management, marketing, finance, exporting, importing). Junior standing

Prerequisites: Junior Standing 

Topics on current developments in international business, technology, and legislation.

Prerequisites: IBUS 380 

Managerial approach to marketing decision making in multicultural market situations.

Prerequisites: MRKT 210, IBUS 380

This course examines cross-cultural differences in business practices. Among the topics covered are the differences in management styles, multiculturalism, international negotiations, as well as international human resource issues, social responsibility and ethics in a global context, international labor relations, cultural synergy and multicultural teams.

Prerequisites: none

International finance functions in a corporation include currency issues, investment, financial markets interacting, raising debt and equity, and export financing.

Prerequisites: IBUS 380 

A capstone course for students majoring in international business designed to analyze and integrate the various international business management decisions.

Prerequisites: IBUS 428, IBUS 448, IBUS 469 (select 2 out of the 3 courses)

This course takes a managerial approach to analyzing marketing decision making in multinational market situations.

Prerequisites: IBUS 380, MRKT 210

Human rights and responsibilities in relation to the organization of society and government.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Late Medieval Philosophy and its influence on the Renaissance, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz and Continental Rationalism, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and British Empiricism, and Kant.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06

Philosophers and philosophies of the 19th century.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06

Critical discussion of the topics chosen from the Asian philosophical traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-08

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Structure and logic of religious belief. Problems such as the existence of God, evil, immortality, miracles, and religious language.

Prerequisites: none

A survey of Western political philosophy from Plato through the Conciliar Movement. An examination of the origin and development of basic concepts defining the relationship between the person and the state: human nature, community, authority, power, legitimacy, obligation, accountability, government, liberty and personal responsibility.

Prerequisites: none

A survey of Western political philosophy from Machiavelli through Edmund Burke. An examination of the development of ideas about government from the 15th Century through the 18th Century. Emphasis is placed on origins of political authority, purposes for which government exists, relationships between government authority and individual rights, civic virtue, republicanism and democracy.

Prerequisites: none

A survey of Western political philosophy from Hegel through the post-modernist writers. An examination of 19th and 20th Century political philosophers emphasizing German transcendentalism, utilitarianism, economic determinism, state socialism, neoliberism, communitarianism and post-modernism.

Prerequisites: none

This course introduces students to the political philosophies of major thinkers from Asia, Africa and the Middle East. The course is designed to enhance students' analytical and writing skills.

Prerequisites: none

History, philosophy, techniques and countermeasures to terroristic and low intensity threats to public order. Both domestic and international terror. The blurring of the lines between low intensity conflict/terrorism and multinational high intensity crime. Same as LAWE 438

Prerequisites: none

This course explores topics in international relations beyond what is covered in the existing curriculum. Students study specialized topics of current importance in the field. Specific topics will change depending on the term and instructor. May be retaken with a change of topic.

Prerequisites: POL 231

An advanced theoretical survey of the dynamics of politics and political change at the global level.

Prerequisites: POL 231

Study of the function and process of the United Nations and other international organizations.

Prerequisites: POL 231

This course is a general overview of US foreign policy institutions, processes, and politics. U.S. foreign policy is examined in historical, global and domestic contexts.

Prerequisites: POL 231

This course explores the interaction of the three complex contemporary political and socioeconomic phenomena: the continuing expansion of global capitalism, the rise of nationalism(s), and the new wave of democratization around the world. The following topics are covered and discussed in class, with references to specific country and regional examples, (1) the impact of international economic institutions and democratization, (2) new forms of political participation in emerging democracies, (3) cultural and ethnic determinants of democratization, (4) problems of economic inequality in new democracies, (5) social and gender issues of democratic transitions, and (6) the relationship between democratic expansion and world peace. Course format will be lecture, discussion, student presentations and occasional films.

Prerequisites: POL 241

Focusing on patterns, processes, and problems of international trade, monetary, technological, and investment relations, this course examines the roles played by key government organizations in managing conflict and cooperation among states.

Prerequisites: POL 231

This interdisciplinary proseminar focuses on conflict resolution in the international arena. We will discuss causes of conflict, examine approaches to the study of conflict resolution, and analyze the varieties of nonviolent strategies of conflict resolution, emphasizing third party mediation.

Prerequisites: POL 231

An overview of the international relations of East Asia, the course examines cooperation and conflict among major powers in the area: China, Japan and the United States. Topics include Japan's pre-WWII expansionism, China's political transformation and North Korea's nuclear controversy. Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: none

This course offers a cross-national perspective on the politics of social policy and the welfare state in industrialized parts of the world, including North and South America and different regions of Europe. It also explores distinct national patterns of public policy solutions to the common contemporary problems of social security, poverty, and health care by paying close attention to both domestic factors and the forces of globalization that work to constrain government decisions. This multidimensional approach is designed to enable students to better understand how politics work in different ways to produce collective or social choices.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course explores topics in comparative politics beyond what is covered in the existing curriculum. Students study specialized topics of current importance in the field. Specific topics will change depending on the term and instructor. May be retaken with a change of topic.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course focuses on the Russian political system in relation to domestic social and economic environments and also on the role of Russia as a global actor. It examines the post communist transformation in Russia and other former Soviet republics.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course introduces students to the governments and politics of the South Asian countries. The historical and cultural context of politics are explored, as well as contemporary issues.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This class explores the dynamics that determine politics and effect change in the region. Using a comparative perspective for the major countries in the region, we examine such issues as Islam, nationalism, resources, regional conflicts, impact of the international system, and political development.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course includes a detailed analysis of select countries and theoretical concerns in Latin American studies. Its general goal is to provide students with the knowledge of Latin American politics and societies in both regional and comparative contexts.

Prerequisites: POL 241

Survey of the political processes, governmental institutions and policies of the countries of the Asian Pacific Rim, with special emphasis on China, Japan and the newly industrializing states of Southeast Asia.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course is designed to acquaint undergraduate and graduate students with key concepts and issues in the study of African politics. The historical and cultural context of politics is explored, as well as topics of current importance in the field.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course discusses government institutions, political developments, and policymaking structures of contemporary Europe, including the former communist countries of East/Central Europe and the Balkans. It will also cover the ongoing process of European integration (European Union) and democratization of the former Soviet bloc countries. Some of the topics covered will include: elections, party systems, federalism and devolution, ethnic and minority policy, social policy, economic reforms, gender and politics, and cross-Atlantic relations with the US.

Prerequisites: POL 241

This course introduces students to key issues and concepts in the study of political and economic development. Both theoretical approaches and empirical data are presented. The course is also designed to enhance students' analytical and research skills.

Prerequisites: POL 241

A comparison of criminal justice philosophies, structures, and procedures found in various countries around the world. Same as LAWE 434

Prerequisites: none

In this course, students will read about crime and deviance in Scandinavia and will develop an understanding of how a culture conceptualizes its ethico-political struggles through literature.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

The course will acquaint students with dynamic forces operating in the field of population and development. Includes an introduction to basic theories and techniques of population analysis, with coverage of global economic forces: fertility, mortality, and migration. The causes and consequences of over-population are discussed with special attention to resource depletion and food shortages.

Prerequisites: none

Major cultural and historical aspects of Spain from ancient times to the present. Prereq: Two years university level Spanish or equivalent

Prerequisites: Two years university level Spanish or equivalent 

Major cultural and historical aspects of Latin America from pre-colonial times to the present. Prereq: Two years university level Spanish or equivalent

Prerequisites: Two years university level Spanish or equivalent 

Topics vary: major writers from Spanish America; Spanish American novel; Spanish American poetry; Spanish American drama; Spanish American short story; romanticism, the Mexican novel. May be repeated for credit. Prereq: Completion of 4 credits of 300 level or equivalent

Prerequisites: Completion of 4 credits of 300 level or equivalent