Ethnic and Multi-Cultural Studies (MS)

The Master of Science in Ethnic and Multicultural Studies Degree Program started in fall semester 2002. The goal at the graduate level is to prepare students to take on higher levels of responsibility in the work force than is possible with a Baccalaureate Degree. The requirements for completion of the M.S. Degre are: 1) pass course work with a minimum of a B grade average; 2) pass a comprehensive examination and 3) writing requirements, for example, a Thesis Plan or 4) with an Alternate Plan Paper.

The program emphasizes a diversity of theories on race and ethnicity, and research methods. for example, Ethnic Studies 401/501: Applied Cultural Research or Ethnic Studies 402W/502: Ethnic Research Methods/Skills. These courses expose students to qualitative, quantiative and evaluation research methods; and computer software technologies such as Qualtrics.

Minnesota State University-Mankato is one of very few universities with this specialty in the Midwest region, and the only university in the Upper Midwest that offers a Master of Science in the field. In summary, the program continues to lead in this academic discipline through the dissemination of academic knowledge that considers the historical and contemporary dynamics on race and ethnic relations in national and internal contexts. 

Program Requirements

Research/Methods Course(s)

Choose 3 - 4 Credit(s).

This course will prepare students to effectively understand and utilize the results of research and will provide an understanding of the processes involved in the conceptualization, design, implementation, and reporting of research, including program evaluation research.

Prerequisites: none

Introduction to research methods as well as tools for becoming a critical consumer of the body of research that exists in educational leadership.

Prerequisites: none

This course introduces concepts and methods of applying socio-cultural understanding to contemporary problems to bring about the empowerment of affected people. Case/field studies and other research methods in social sciences will be used to illustrate the impact and problems of culture change with special attention to its affect on disadvantaged groups of people. Students will also design their own applied projects.

Prerequisites: none

This is a comprehensive course, which introduces students to qualitative, quantitative and evaluation social research methods. It provides students with hands-on experience of collecting and analyzing data, from any given diverse ethnic community through participant observation and needs assessment.

Prerequisites: none

Descriptive statistics, probability, hypothesis testing, introduction to non-parametric statistics, correlation, introduction to regression analysis, spatial statistics and principles of data representation in graphs, tables and statistical results.

Prerequisites: none

Examines and applies research methods common to health science. Requires an extensive literature review. This course should be taken near the end of a graduate program when the student is ready to begin work on the thesis or alternate plan paper. The student must have completed a plan of study prior to enrollment.

Prerequisites: none

Concepts and methods of conducting applied social science research.

Prerequisites: none

Research methodology and statistical procedures involving descriptive and inferential techniques for simple and multivariate situations involving parametric and non parametric variables using manual and computer methods.

Prerequisites: none

Restricted Electives

Core Courses - Choose 15 Credit(s). 12 credits must at the 600 level.

An advanced seminar examining the ways anthropologists pratice anthropology. The course explores theoretical foundations and issues related to the professional practice of anthropology and focuses on developing necessary skills for sound professional practice.

Prerequisites: none

This course is specific to the counseling profession, focusing on both the cultural and sociopolitical forces influencing people in a multicultural society, as well as the microskills necessary for engaging in cross-cultural counselor-client interactions.

Prerequisites: none

This course will examine issues confronted in a multicultural society. It will study ethnic/minority groups not usually included in mainstream society, including their uniqueness and harmonious co-existence with other ethnic groups.

Prerequisites: none

Students will examine the forces which create and maintain prejudice, discrimination, and racism. Special attention will be given to the work of Paulo Freire.

Prerequisites: none

This course will take an interdisciplinary ethnic studies approach to examine the past, present and future implications of the African American civil rights movement on race relations in the United States.

Prerequisites: none

Scholars preparing for and/or working in the helping professions or related careers will address the issues and experiences of culturally different persons. Special attention will be given to preparation for effective cross-cultural interactions.

Prerequisites: none

This course is designed for those students or professionals who prepare for and/or work in the diverse organizations/institutions, corporations, communities in and outside America. Theories, techniques and skills for cross-cultural training/consultation and diversity management are covered.

Prerequisites: none

Graduate scholars will address the meaning and significance of US race and ethnicity within global perspectives. Special attention will be given to the writings of scholars of color.

Prerequisites: none

Supervised experience to which the theories and methodologies of ethnic studies can be applied. Opportunities may be on-campus and/or off-campus, including work in other countries.

Prerequisites: none

Changing nature of management of urban and human behavior in the municipal organization. Emphasis on the development of decision-making and communication skills.

Prerequisites: none

HR Management/Leadership - Choose 1 - 3 Credit(s). Choose one course.

This seminar provides an avenue for the exploration and investigation of special study topics in educational leadership.

Prerequisites: none

This course will address critical issues facing women in developing countries in the context of an increasingly globalized order. The purpose of the course is to familiarize students with global issues/global feminist theory.

Prerequisites: none

Change is the constant in today's human resource management in public organizations. The technical framework for productivity improvement and employee development is placed in the context of the legal environment. Emphasis is on managing diversity.

Prerequisites: none

Implications of sociological knowledge for the administration of Human Services programs. Theoretical and practical aspects of administration with the social service systems.

Prerequisites: none

Provides an overview of urban administrative services with an emphasis on urban finance systems and human resource management. Examines the economic and human resource environment for local government managers' decision-making.

Prerequisites: none

Counseling - Choose 3 - 4 Credit(s).

Provides the developing helping professional with an introduction to basic helping skills: attending, listening, responding to content and affect, probing, and providing feedback. The course is experiential in nature and includes small group interaction, videotaping, and role playing simulations.

Prerequisites: none

Philosophies and strategies of professional counseling. Overview of counseling literature, field of counseling, and development of the professional counselor.

Prerequisites: none

A review and analysis of major counseling theories coupled with empirical support and specific counseling theory techniques and theoretical case analysis.

Prerequisites: none

The primary purpose of this graduate course is to introduce the principles and techniques of assessment and case formulation utilized by behaviorally oriented clinical psychologists. The course focuses on behavioral assessment and case formulation as a process of identifying specific behaviors of concern, developing a treatment plan, and evaluating treatment outcomes.

Prerequisites: none

Beginning theory and related techniques of counseling and vocational development are presented utilizing lecture and role play to convey key concepts in rehabilitation counseling. (Fall)

Prerequisites: none

Applied theory and techniques in rehabilitation counseling are presented, including specific applications to various disabilities in both groups and individual practice. Interactions are required in addition to regular class meetings. (Spring)

Prerequisites: none

Ethnic Studies - Choose 6 - 9 Credit(s).

The purpose of this course is to examine the challenges and opportunities of the new immigrants,refugees,families,and specifically their children,in the United States.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines contemporary topics in the lives of African Americans. These topics include but are not limited to: slavery, Reconstruction, Post-Reconstruction, Separate-But-Equal, Desegregation, and Resegregation.(S) Prerequisite: ETHN 500 or consent

Prerequisites: none

Examination of current issues affecting the status of Asian Americans. The focus of this course will vary to reflect students' interests in the area of politics, education, economics, social and/or cultural dealing with Asian Americans.

Prerequisites: none

Thematic examination of major issues surrounding Latino/Hispanic communities in the United States. Emphasis will be on education, labor, politics, social welfare, and migration.

Prerequisites: none

This course is concerned with racial/ethnic minorities who live in large urban (inner city) areas. It is especially concerned with the roles that culture and discrimination play in the shaping of America's ghettos, barrios, reservations, and Chinatowns.

Prerequisites: none

Examines the effects of sexism and racism on women of color and provides an understanding of the significant contributions they have made in their struggles against oppression.

Prerequisites: none

The course examines racial and ethnic minorities and the mutual influences between these groups and the structures, procedures, and issues of U.S. politics. Major topics include: public opinion on racial issues, the representation of minorities in elective and appointive offices, and the nature of value conflicts underlying contemporary racial issues, including affirmative action, immigration, welfare, language policies, and Native American tribal issues.

Prerequisites: none

This course will examine different definitions of family through time in the U.S.. It will focus on changes in the African-, Native-, Hispanic/Latino-, and Asian-American families. It will also compare and contrast differences and similarities among ethnic minority families as well as between them and white ethnic families.

Prerequisites: none

Multiple perspectives on the selected topic(s) will be addressed. Student scholars may contribute to the selection and/or refinement of the topic(s).

Prerequisites: none

The purpose of this seminar is to examine the origins, manifestations, and consequences of oppression on the life experiences of people at the individual, institutional and sociocultural levels in contemporary society.

Prerequisites: none

This examines the relevant issues surrounding environmental justice, with a particular emphasis on political ecology, resource colonialism, environmental racism, applied ethnic studies, and local environmental movements and minority advocacy and focuses on professional application and advocacy through practice.

Prerequisites: none

Specialized independent study and research.

Prerequisites: none

Capstone Course

Choose 1 - 3 Credit(s). Required Written Comprehensive and Oral Exam plus Thesis or Alternate Plan Paper

Concluding research project. May largely use secondary sources. (F,S)

Prerequisites: none

Concluding research project. Requires toward original research. (F,S)

Prerequisites: none