Aging Studies (MS)

Capstone Project: As part of the practicum, students will complete a final paper to be negotiated between the Practicum Supervisor, the Student and the Adviser. This paper will serve as a capstone project showcasing mastery earned through completion of all required coursework. Determination of the number of practicum hours required is made by the Minnesota Board of Nursing Home Examiners for each student and requires an application. Credits are assigned based upon the number of hours of internship required at a rate of 45 hours per credit with a 1 credit minimum and a 6 credit maximum. Additional hours may be required by the State of Minnesota, but no additional credits beyond the maximum of 6 will be counted toward completion of this graduate certificate. Undergraduate courses listed as a part of this Graduate Certificate are included as they are approved by the State of Minnesota as meeting the requirements for preparation for the licensure examinations.

 

Graduates of the Aging Studies MS program are well-prepared for successful careers in the field of aging or for doctoral training in aging studies or gerontology. Although not all students choose to do so, it is currently possible to complete the MS fully online.

View Admission Requirements

Program Requirements

Common Core

GERO 697 requires six (6) credits.

This course will provide students with an integrated knowledge of theory and practice in gerontology and examine the challenges involved in studying and providing services to the elderly, as well as ethical and advocacy-related issues in an aging society.

Prerequisites: none

.

Prerequisites: none

Research/Methods Course(s)

A 600-level research course from any department (3 credits) is required.

Restricted Electives

Social - Psychological - Choose 3 Credit(s).

An evolutionary and cross-cultural examination of the aging process, status, and treatment of the elderly.

Prerequisites: none

Social and social-psychological forces in later life. Problems and prospects of growing old in the United States.

Prerequisites: none

Study of the structure of human response to death, dying, and bereavement in their socio-cultural, interpersonal, and personal context. Formation of children's perception of death, functions of the funeral, euthanasia, and suicide are among the topics to be discussed.

Prerequisites: none

Bio Medical - Choose 3 Credit(s).

Cross-cultural examination of the response of peoples in non-Western societies to the human universal of illness. Non-Western concepts of disease, health, and treatment.

Prerequisites: none

Emphasis is placed on the biomedical aspects of aging and chronic disease. The course is designed for students majoring in biology, gerontology programs, or other health related programs.

Prerequisites: none

This course investigates the physical and mental health concerns of the aging process. Explores specific health problems confronting older persons, and examines preventive health behaviors and health maintenance practices.

Prerequisites: none

Policy / Applied Theory - Choose 3 Credit(s).

Engaging with the practice of policy development, understanding critical policies impacting the experience of aging, and learning how to become a policy entrepreneur will be the focus for this course. The course will also explore innovations in aging policy globally.

Prerequisites: none

Topics vary as announced in class schedule. May be retaken for credit if topic is different.

Prerequisites: none

This course will focus upon the critical examination of leadership in the context of organizations serving older populations. The course will include exploration of decisions, processes and ideas exhibited by transformational leaders in aging in the US and globally.

Prerequisites: none

Issues, resources, and processes in working with the elderly and their families in the social service system.

Prerequisites: none

Unrestricted Electives

Choose 8 - 14 Credit(s).

Issues and trends, programs and services, funding mechanisms and regulations. Meets state educational requirements for specific content areas.

Prerequisites: none

The system approach to analyzing family situations to make decisions and correlate resources in the resolution of family managerial problems. Emphasis on the application of managerial skills to lifestyle situations: young-families, elderly, special needs, singles, and low income.

Prerequisites: none

Topic varies with offering. May be taken more than once.

Prerequisites: none

Explores the relationship of death concerns to the process of meaningful living. Utilizes a variety of learning strategies to examine death attitudes, values ,and related behaviors.

Prerequisites: none

Leisure as an integral aspect of successful aging is the focus of this course which includes: leisure in relation to physical, intellectual, social, and psychological aspects of aging and successful leisure programming in community based settings and in long term care.

Prerequisites: none

Implications of sociological knowledge for the administration of Human Services programs. Theoretical and practical aspects of administration with the social service systems.

Prerequisites: none

This course will address theoretical and practical aspects of the planning and evaluation process within social service systems. Evidence-based methods of developing programs and measuring their effectiveness in the human services will be addressed.

Prerequisites: none

Capstone Course

Choose 1 - 6 Credit(s).