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Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota State University, Mankato

Field Education Manual

Page address: http://sbs.mnsu.edu/fieldeducation/manual.html

You can view the manual below or download it from this link: [PDF] Field Education Manual. (3 MiB)

You can view the Field Instructor Guide from this link: [PDF] Field Instructor Guide (687 KiB)

Updated Field Policies:

INTRODUCTION

Welcome Letter

Glossary of Terms

 

WELCOME TO FIELD EDUCATION

Welcome to one of the most anticipated and exciting components of your social work education, field practicum. Field is where student learning of theories, values, ethics, and skills connects to the real work practice of social work. The social work practicum and seminars are the capstone academic experience of BSSW and MSW program in the Department of Social Work at Minnesota State University, Mankato, leading to graduation with either a Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BSSW) degree or Master of Social Work (MSW) degree. BSSW and MSW degrees allow its graduates access to specific opportunities, rights, privileges, and obligations pertaining to the practice of social work in the State of Minnesota, nationally, and internationally.

Field education is not possible without the support of the communities, agencies and field instructors who open their doors for the students to be mentored. Without this support, students would not be able to participate in the most essential part of their educational journey. The journey begins when a student chooses a degree in social work. This choice is usually built on the passion they possess to want to change and influence individuals, families and communities. Students bring their hearts to social work. They then develop their minds by studying social work practice theories and research. They become great problem solvers and scholars. Finally, students bring their hearts and their minds to the final step in the journey as they learn how to engage themselves in the practice of social work. Field practicum is the combination of their hearts, minds, and hands. This unique journey is the foundation of field education that elevates it to be the signature pedagogy of social work education and continues to shape the next generation of professionals.

This manual contains information regarding Departmental policy, practice standards, and processes to which the student must comply for completion of the capstone requirement and ultimately, graduation. Students and field agencies are strongly encouraged to read and focus on those sections relevant to their particular place in the BSSW or MSW program. This manual will help students understand the connection between field education and over all course of their social work education.

Congratulations on beginning your journey to becoming a social worker. Even though the destination may be the goal, the learning is in the journey.


Laura Benesch, MSW, LICSW
BSSW Director of Field Education

Jennifer Parker, MSW, LICSW
MSW Director of Field Education

 

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

The following terms, defined here, will appear throughout the manual:

CSWE – the Council on Social Work Education provides the accreditation standards to which all accredited social work programs must adhere.

Department – the Minnesota State University, Mankato, Department of Social Work.

Field Director – Department liaison that provides oversight, direction, and support to students and Field Instructors involved with the field education program. Field Director will have additional administrative duties for the MSW field education programming.

Field Seminar Liaison – Refers to the faculty member who represents the Department and provides the link between the department, the agency, and the student. The field seminar liaison monitors, consults, and intervenes when necessary to ensure a quality field experience occurs for all students.

Field Instructor – staff person employed by the agency who serves as the lead contact person for a practicum student, typically holds the BSSW and/or MSW degree and serves as the Agency Field Instructor (CSWE preferred model). In this manual you will see reference to this role as field instructor or agency field instructor.

Foundation year – the first year of the MSW program, student not holding a BSW/BSSW from an accredited program must complete this year before moving on to the specialization year. Used interchangeably with “first year.”

Off-site Field Instructor – an appropriately degreed social worker from the community who provides field instruction and guidance to reinforce the social work perspective when a BSSW/MSW-trained Field Instructor is not available within the agency (model allowed by CSWE). In this manual you will see reference to this role as field instructor or off-site field instructor.

NASW – the National Association of Social Workers is an organization that guides professional social workers to make ethically sound decisions in their everyday practice.

Practicum site – agency or organization that agrees to host a student for the field practicum.

Specialization year – the second year of the traditional 2-year MSW program, Specialization year is completed by all students admitted to the MSW program. Used interchangeably with “second year.”

SONIA – the field database system that manages field placement information.

University – refers to Minnesota State University, Mankato

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MISSION STATEMENTS AND PURPOSE OF FIELD EDUCATION

UNIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES MISSION STATEMENT

BSSW MISSION STATEMENT

MSW MISSION STATEMENT

GENERALIST PRACTICE DEFINITION

ADVANCED GENERALIST PRACTICE DEFINITION

GOALS OF BSSW PROGRAM

GOALS OF MSW PROGRAM

COUNCIL ON SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION CORE COMPETENCIES & BEHAVIORS

 

UNIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT

Minnesota State University, Mankato promotes learning through effective undergraduate and graduate teaching, scholarship, and research in service to the state, the region and the global community.

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES MISSION STATEMENT

The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences is a community of diverse learners seeking to understand and transform the social world through inquire, inspiration, service and innovation

BSSW MISSION STATEMENT

The BSSW program at Minnesota State University, Mankato builds on a strong liberal arts foundation to prepare its graduates for professional generalist social work practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. The program commits to ethical and competent professional practice and service with compassion and integrity. The program empowers social work students to understand the experience, culture, and the diverse contexts of clients’ lives and to honor their voices. The program commits to professional practice that enhances human well-being and advocates for social, economic, and environmental justice for all members of our diverse and global society. The program’s graduates are resourceful problem-solvers who are prepared to make a difference through policy and practice in the ever-changing global society. The program also contributes to the work of the profession and social service agencies through consultation, scholarship, research, and leadership. (Adopted 12/05/2016)

MSW MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the Master of Social (MSW) Program is to empower students to be ethical and culturally responsive advanced generalist social workers who are champions and advocates for social justice, economic justice, and the equality of human rights at all system levels. Located in Mankato, a mid-size community that serves as a regional hub for surrounding small and rural communities, we build on strengths and address the social, economic, and cultural challenges confronting small and rural communities. We are also committed to developing social work leaders with an awareness of historical and contemporary social, economic, and cultural issues in a broader and global context. (Adopted 03/01/2017)

GENERALIST PRACTICE DEFINITION

Generalist practice is grounded in the liberal arts and the person-in-environment framework. To promote human and social well-being, generalist practitioners use a range of prevention and intervention methods in their practice with diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities based on scientific inquiry and best practices. The generalist practitioner identifies with the social work profession and applies ethical principles and critical thinking in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Generalist practitioners engage diversity in their practice and advocate for human rights and social and economic justice. They recognize, support, and build on the strengths and resiliency of all human beings. They engage in research-informed practice and are proactive in responding to the impact of context on professional practice. (Adopted from CSWE EPAS 2015 Educational Policy 2.0 on 9.14.16.)

ADVANCED GENERALIST PRACTICE DEFINITION

Advanced generalist practice builds on mastery of the generalist foundation to increase the depth and breadth of practice. Advanced generalist practice integrates greater theoretical and methodological sophistication for differential application of advanced social work knowledge, theories, skills, values and ethics in the assessment of and intervention with individuals, couples, families, groups, organizations and communities. Advanced generalist practice emphasizes the unique characteristics of social work services in the small and rural community context. Advanced generalist practice enhances the profession through the application and integration of research and evaluation at all levels of practice.

The advanced generalist practitioner:

  • Integrates culturally responsive social work services throughout all intervention levels.
  • Effectively addresses the complex environment of service provision through sophisticated application of an advanced skill set across varied social work roles with emphasis on the context of small and rural communities.
  • Engages in ethical, independent direct practice with individuals, families and groups and indirect practice in organizational administration and change, policy development, and community practice.
  • Demonstrates leadership in both direct and indirect practice at all system levels.
  • Encourages and engages in interdisciplinary collaboration and public-private partnerships.
  • Engages in advocacy, policy practice, and social change to advance social and economic justice.

Adopted: June 9, 2006; Revised and Adopted: January 7, 2008; Revised and Adopted: October 13, 2008; Revised and Adopted: March 21, 2012; Revised and Adopted: April 26, 2017

GOALS OF BSSW PROGRAM

The Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BSSW) major prepares students for generalist professional social work practice at all system levels with an emphasis on small communities and rural areas within the global context, and provides a foundation for graduate-level social work education. Students become competent in nine broad areas including knowledge, values, skills, and cognitive and affective processes to practice at a generalist professional level.

  1. Prepares competent professional generalist social work practitioners for work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. [Comps 1-9]
  2. Promotes identification with the social work profession and commitment to the profession’s values and ethics that guide practice. [Comp 1]
  3. Values human well-being and advocates for human rights through social, economic, and environmental justice. [Comps 2, 3, & 5]
  4. Develops critical thinkers as resourceful problem-solvers that analyze and respond to diverse global contexts. [Comps, 2, 3, 4, & 5]
  5. Prepares graduates for social work careers and life-long learning through a strong liberal arts foundation. [Comps 1-9]
  6. 6. Supports the profession and communities at large through consultation, scholarship, research, and leadership. [Comps 1-9]

Adopted: 01/05/2017.

GOALS OF MSW PROGRAM

  1. Prepare advanced generalist social workers that understand and identify with the values and ethics that serve to guide culturally responsive social work practice [C 1].
  2. Prepare advanced generalist social workers that are able to critically and differentially apply the knowledge, theories, values, and skills required to engage in research-informed practice and planned change (i.e. engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation) at all system levels, emphasizing the small and rural community context [C 4, 6, 7, 8, 9].
  3. Prepare advanced generalist social workers who build upon strengths, are committed to affirming diversity and difference in practice, and are advocates for the advancement of human rights and social and economic justice at all system levels [C 2, 3].
  4. Prepare advanced generalist social workers as leaders who critically analyze, respond to, and shape the practice context, emphasizing rural and small communities [C 7].
  5. Prepare advanced generalist social workers who engage in policy practice to deliver effective social work services and advance social and economic well-being [C 5].
  6. Model and promote the core values of competency and service through life-long learning, scholarship, community involvement, and the promotion of the social work profession, spanning local to global communities [C 1].

Adopted: June 9, 2006; Revised and Adopted: January 7, 2008; Revised and adopted: March 2012; Revised and adopted: April 19, 2017

[The numbers in parentheses after Goals refer to sections of the "Educational Policies and Accreditation Standards" (EPAS) of the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).]

 

COUNCIL ON SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION CORE COMPETENCIES & BEHAVIORS

Field education lays a solid foundation in all of the above definitions and goals. In addition, the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) proposes Core Competencies that apply throughout a student’s social work education and behaviors that apply to BSSW and MSW foundation year students. Each competency describes the knowledge, values, skills, and cognitive and affective processes that involve each competency at the generalist level of practice followed by a set of behaviors that integrate these. Additionally, the Department has added specialized behaviors as students complete their specialization year of the MSW program. For list of Core Competencies and Behaviors for BSSW/MSW Foundation year and MSW Specialization year please see SOWK Appendix 1 following this manual.CSWE Competencies & Behaviors

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ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

RESPONSIBILITIES OF BSSW/MSW FIELD DIRECTOR

RESPONSIBILITIES OF FIELD SEMINAR LIAISON

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

RESPONSIBILITIES OF FIELD INTRUCTOR

RESPONSIBILITIES OF OFF-SITE FIELD INSTRUCTOR

 

RESPONSIBILITIES OF BSSW/MSW FIELD DIRECTOR

The BSSW and MSW Field Directors are University faculty members who serve as the Social Work Department liaisons and provide oversight, direction, and support to students and field instructors involved with the field education program. The Field Directors provide additional administrative duties for the delivery of the field education programs including managing the field education database, Sonia. The BSSW Field Director oversees the undergraduate field program while the MSW Field Director oversees the MSW field program.

Responsibilities include:

  • Oversee all the aspects of placing students in appropriate settings with credentialed social workers.
  • Develop and monitor field practicum settings and field instructors to assure their willingness to abide by field education goals and policies.
  • Provide initial and on-going orientation to all new sites to discuss the policies and procedures of the Department and provide information regarding online resources available (i.e. Field Education Manual, trainings).
  • Provide annual and ongoing online field education training for field instructors, especially for all first time field instructors.
  • Provide guidelines for the development and evaluation of student performance through the Learning Contract and Evaluation.
  • Provide dates for the beginning and end of field practicum placement as well as deadlines for receipt of Learning Contracts and Evaluations.
  • Provide a general review of feedback from student evaluations to agencies and field instructors.
  • Provide long-term development of the field education program, oversight of Memorandum of Agreements and Placement Agreements, field manual, program evaluation processes, field education trainings, and the field database.
  • Assign final grades for field practicum and/or seminar courses as well as final decision on all field related inquiries.
  • Approve of all agreements between students and agencies when the practicum site is also the student’s employer, as guided by CSWE standards and relevant field policy.
  • Develop and maintain adequate field education sites within 150 mile radius of MSU, Mankato through field education database.
  • Ensure all field policies and University policies and procedures are followed throughout a students’ field practicum experience.
  • Orientate new students to the field practicum process and to the online field database system.
  • Consult with field faculty and field seminar liaisons regarding policy changes, updates, and student concerns.
  • Educate BSSW and MSW faculty on field program updates and changes.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF FIELD SEMINAR LIAISON

The field seminar liaison is an important element in a student’s field practicum experience. They are the representative of the Department of Social Work that provides the link between the department, the agency, and the student. The field seminar liaison monitors, consults, and intervenes when necessary to ensure a quality field experience occurs for all students. Seminar focuses on facilitating student led problem-solving, providing support and integration of knowledge and application in field education.

Responsibilities include:

  • Monitor the field placement through in-person visits, and written and verbal communication with both students and field instructors.
  • Conduct ongoing dialogue regarding the process, procedures, and progress of the field practicum with students and field instructors.
  • Maintain knowledge and understanding of the CSWE core competencies and foundation/specialization behaviors.
  • Schedule, at minimum, one site visit per semester during the practicum. Additional visits can be made at the discretion of the field seminar liaison, student, or field instructor.
  • Final oversight of the Learning Contract to assure the student has the opportunity to develop and practice a range of knowledge, values, skills, and cognitive and affective processes.
  • Offer consultation, mediation and support regarding student or agency concerns or disputes to ensure maximum field experiences for students via the telephone, email, or by a site visit.
  • Facilitate seminar discussions with students.
  • Read and respond/provide feedback to students’ class assignments.
  • Provide a syllabus for content of seminar instruction.
  • Assist students with integration of coursework and practicum experiences.
  • Recommends assigned grade for practicum and seminar in collaboration with the Field Director.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENT

The social work student is the essential person in the field practicum experience. Students are expected to take an active role in their professional development. Therefore, it is expected that the student participate in the planning and implementing their learning experience while in field practicum.

Responsibilities include:

  • Participate in practicum placement process by completing the application processes and placement materials in a timely manner.
  • Obtain and maintain student liability insurance during enrollment in field practicum.
  • Conduct themselves as social work professionals by adhering to the NASW Code of Ethics.
  • Read, understand, and follow this manual as it is explicit regarding completing the required prerequisites for field practicum and field seminar.
  • Review agency policy and procedures, as directed by the field instructor.
  • Act within the requirements of that agency. This includes, but is not limited to, adhering to policies regarding safety, documentation, practice and procedures, confidentiality for both the agency and clients, the use of computer and telephone for personal reasons, and dress code.
  • Develop and negotiate an appropriate Learning Contract with their field instructor and field seminar liaison drawing on the learning objectives of the student and opportunities that the agency can provide consistent with the CSWE core competencies and behaviors.
  • Adhere to field placement and program timeframes.
  • Communicate with the field instructor and the field seminar liaison regarding the field placement, especially if difficulties arise that could disrupt field practicum.
  • Students, who are in need of off-site field instruction, will make themselves available for off-site field instruction meetings throughout the semester.
  • Respond to communications from the Field Director, field seminar liaison, and placement sites in a timely manner.
  • Seek supervision when there is any doubt about actions they are taking or on behalf of the agency or clients.
  • Participate in evaluation of field agency, Field Instructors, and field program.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF FIELD INTRUCTOR

Field instructors are an integral part of the practicum experience by helping students to identify with and take responsibility for the professions, to value and affirm diversity and culturally sensitive practice, and to implement the goals of the profession through contributions of scholarship and service. In some instances, a social work degreed field instructor is not available in the practicum setting and an off-site field instructor is assigned to the student to reinforce the social work perspective.

Responsibilities include:

  • Orient the student to the agency including but not limited to personnel policies and procedures related to a weekly schedule, safety, documentation, transporting clients, social media, and confidentiality. This also includes arranging for office space and facilitating any paperwork for the payment of all related expenses (i.e. mileage) as discussed and agreed upon.
  • Allow students to ask questions a new employee might not feel free to ask, and allow time for reflection and the active application of knowledge and skills with client systems including assignments for practicum and seminar.
  • Provide opportunities for students to observe early on, with the expectation that the student will gradually take on more independent work and assignments (under supervision). The student should manage approximately 1/3 of the caseload of a regular worker.
  • If the student is concurrently employed in the agency, the field instructor should also assist the student in adhering to the guidelines in this manual that address that circumstance. If the student is to receive a stipend from the agency, the field instructor should also facilitate that process while maintaining the educational intent and focus of the field placement.
  • Consult and negotiate with the student to develop a Learning Contract that outlines specific opportunities, responsibilities and tasks consistent with the CSWE Core Competencies.
  • To make reading, writing, task, participation, or training assignments as needed to benefit student learning and services provision. Field instructors are asked to balance their need to make assignments with the assignments that are required for other courses. Seminar assignments may be read or discussed with the field instructor as part of the student’s Learning Contract.
  • Meet with the student, at a minimum of one hour per week, to monitor progress toward meeting the Learning Contract goals and assess the student’s contribution to client care in regularly scheduled, face-to-face meetings.
  • Notify the field seminar liaison immediately of any serious concerns or problems related to student performance and/or attendance.
  • Assess student performance at the evaluation periods identified by field seminar liaison. The input of other social workers and staff may be considered.
  • Meet with field seminar liaison and student to monitor progress in Learning Contract.
  • Participate in orientation with Field Director prior to or at the beginning of the field practicum.
  • Complete one five-hour field instructor training through the Department. Trainings will be provided once a year on the MSU, M campus and available as an online training course. Field instructors taking students for the first time or those who have not had a student in the last three years are strongly encouraged to take this training prior to supervising a field practicum student.
  • Provide feedback and evaluation of field education program.

RESPONSIBILITIES OF OFF-SITE FIELD INSTRUCTOR

The Off-site Field Instructor is an appropriately degreed social worker from the community who provides supervision and guidance to “reinforce the social work perspective” (CSWE, 2002) when a degreed social worker is not available within the agency (model allowed by CSWE). Although the Off-site Field Instructor cannot maintain the same level of participation as an on-site supervisor, generally speaking they should strive to perform in a similar fashion. Responsibilities include:

  • Provide field practicum instruction in individual and/or small group formats depending on the needs of the student(s) and the interests of the Off-site Field Instructor(s).
  • Provide instruction either on campus or in local community.
  • Instruction will focus on discussion of student experiences of applying social work principles, theory, and practice methodology.
  • May make reading assignments regarding specific populations, techniques, and or other social work information and resources.
  • Assist the student and on-site Field Instructor with the development of the learning contract.
  • Assist in completing the student performance at the evaluation periods identified by Field Seminar Liaison.
  • Participate in continuing education hours available through the Department.
  • Provide consultation regarding student performance if circumstances arise that may require remediation or disciplinary actions.
  • Provide feedback and evaluation of field education program.
  • May make reading assignments regarding specific populations, techniques, and or other social work information and resources.

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DEPARTMENT POLICIES FOR FIELD PRACTICUM

ETHICAL BEHAVIOR AND NON-ACADEMIC GOOD STANDING POLICY

COMMUNICATION & CONFIDENTIALITY POLICY

CREDIT FOR LIFE EXPERIENCE OR PREVIOUS COURSEWORK EXPERIENCE POLICY

CREDIT-EARNING OUT-OF-REGION & INTERNATIONAL COURSEWORK

TRANSPORTATION OF SELF & CLIENTS POLICY

CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK POLICY

INCLEMENT WEATHER POLICY

DISTRACTION & TECHNOLOGY USE POLICY

ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

STUDENT SAFETY POLICY

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AND NONDISCRIMINATION IN EDUCATION POLICY

PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES POLICY

GRIEVANCE POLICY

 

Students are required to adhere to all the following MnSCU, University, Department of Social Work, and BSSW or MSW Program policies and practices as they develop, engage in, and complete their practicum. Planning for field practicum begins at least one semester BEFORE the practicum actually starts. Failure to comply with the following policies can impact the development of a field practicum and can result in not completing the program in a timely manner.

 

ETHICAL BEHAVIOR AND NON-ACADEMIC GOOD STANDING POLICY

Non-academic good standing in Field Education refers to professional performance. Students are required to demonstrate behaviors consistent with the NASW Code of Ethics, and the MSU, Mankato Student Responsibility Policy. Student conduct towards clients, student colleagues, field instructors, agency personnel, and/or the field faculty will be evaluated based on these professionally established guidelines. Additionally, students are expected to comply with the Student Responsibilities Policy outlined in BSSW and MSW Student handbooks.

All practicum students should be familiar with the NASW Code of Ethics and the Minnesota Licensure Board Practice Standards. Requirements regarding data privacy as outlined in the Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information (“Privacy Rule’) implemented in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act 1996 (“HIPPA’).Students should adhere to these standards throughout their social work practicum.

Any complaints produced by clients, agency personnel, student colleagues, faculty members, and/or the field seminar liaison including, but not limited to, the following areas may result in corrective instruction, disciplinary action, suspension, and/or a grade of No Credit (NC) in either or both field practicum and seminar. If complaints are made, students will be provided due process to respond to allegations. Additionally, reconsideration of the student being retained in the field practicum and/or dismissal from the BSSWMSW program are possible. Here are examples of complaints and violations of this policy:

Unprofessional performance can include, but are not limited to:

  • A lack of commitment to the values and ethics of the social work profession;
  • The inability to establish and maintain positive and constructive interpersonal relationships with clients, colleagues, and field instructors;
  • The inability to perform professional duties due to personal problems;
  • Refusal to accept and follow through on field placement assignments;
  • The inability to accept constructive feedback from the field instructors and/or field faculty;
  • Attendance problems or failure to communicate with field instructors about schedule changes outside of the originally established practicum schedule;
  • The inability to meet deadlines or complete responsibilities and duties;
  • The inability to apply professional skills and knowledge gained through classroom learning to the field experience;
  • Violation of professional relationship boundaries including, but not exclusively, inappropriate physical contact, any harassment, social/sexual involvement, or emotional abuse;
  • Violation of client and/or agency confidentiality;
  • Evidence of impairment that, in the judgment of the placement agency or field seminar liaison, jeopardizes the primary client and/or agency interests;
  • Disciplinary action as a result of academic performance;
  • Criminal charges that reflect personal behaviors incompatible with the expected behaviors and/or ethics of professional social workers;
  • Any behavior that is incompatible with the NASW Code of Ethics/Practice Standards/HIPPA (e.g., falsifying records, misrepresentation of work performed, misleading consumers, harassment of field instructor, agency personnel, clients, fellow students, and/or faculty).

Some types of disciplinary action taken against a student must, by law, be reported on the MN Board of Social Work Application for Licensure when an application is made for licensure. When a student already holds a license in social work, other licensed social workers and social work faculty are obligated to report ethical violations. Contact the Minnesota Board of Social Work for additional information . Other professionals with whom the student works in the practicum setting may have similar reporting obligations depending upon their professional codes or workplace policies.

COMMUNICATION & CONFIDENTIALITY POLICY

Communication between the Field Seminar Liaison, Field Instructor/Agency Field Instructor, Off-site Field Instructor (when applicable) and/or the student is a critical component to the success of all placements and should occur throughout the practicum. The Field Instructors, Field Seminar Liaison, or student may initiate such communication using any of a variety of formats (telephone, letters, in person, fax, email, etc.). The Field Coordinators/Directors and Field Seminar Liaisons may consult with the Department of Social Work faculty if the need arises.

As instantaneous communication such as email, text, blogs, and listservs has become more common, and traditional communication channels like the telephone and ground mail have not abated, students must be extremely cautious about breaching confidentiality. The impulse to respond instantaneously to requests for information, even to other professionals, must be resisted. The student”s responsibility is to seek supervision when there is any doubt about communicating information or taking action within or on behalf of the agency or a client. Additionally, information from the practicum site is prohibited from use in personal communication (verbally, online, or in print) without written permission of the agency field instructor and field seminar liaison. This includes sharing information about field practicum sites, clients, other students, or staff on social media sites. While students will be discussing their work with clients in seminar and in the agency, strict adherence to confidentiality standards, redacting information from documents or reports, and disguising client data must occur. Breaches of client or agency confidentiality can have serious consequences for the student including dismissal from the program. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) standards should be reviewed and carefully followed. Students should discuss how these are implemented in their respective agencies with the Agency Field Instructor.

Students are cautioned against the use of personal cell phones for conducting agency business. The automatic appearance of personal numbers on a cell phone log allows the client to contact the student at any time regardless of when the student is actually “on the clock” in the practicum setting. Setting appropriate boundaries may be difficult with that level of access. Additionally, inadvertent release of client information through a client call or the observation of names/numbers (for others who might use the student”s cell phone) is also a breach of confidentiality. Password protections should be implemented on personal devices if they are used for professional business. Precautions should be taken to prevent theft or usage by unauthorized individuals.

CREDIT FOR LIFE EXPERIENCE OR PREVIOUS COURSEWORK EXPERIENCE POLICY

Although previous work experience will support and enhance participation in the practicum experience, under no circumstances will previous life or work experience substitute for practicum hours. SOWK 450/455, SOWK 615/SOWK 625 and SOWK 665/SOWK 675 are never waived for any reason, nor will transfer credits be substituted.

BSSW students are expected to read and comply with the Credit for Life Experience or Previous Work Experience Policy stipulated in the BSSW Program Student Handbook. MSW students are expected to read and comply with the Credit for Life Experience or Previous Work Experience Policy stipulated in the MSW Program Graduate Student Handbook.

CREDIT-EARNING OUT-OF-REGION & INTERNATIONAL COURSEWORK

BSSW students are expected to comply with the BSSW Credit-Earning Out-Of-Region & International Coursework policy stipulated in the BSSW Program Student Handbook. MSW Students are expected to comply with the MSW Credit-Earning Out-Of-Region & International Coursework policy stipulated in the MSW Program Graduate Student Handbook.

TRANSPORTATION OF SELF & CLIENTS POLICY

Department of Social Work BSSW and MSW students in field education placements (junior field experience, senior practicum, or graduate level practicum) are responsible for providing their own transportation to and from their field placement site. In some very limited situations (e.g. international student without valid license, student with disability), students may request assistance from the Department to make other transportation arrangements.

Practicum students are not expected to transport clients unless the Agency clearly communicates with the practicum student and field seminar liaison that such requirement is an essential duty of the practicum responsibilities. It is the responsibility of the agency to state whether practicum students are required to drive, travel, or transport clients as part of their duties and to manage any such requirements. Agencies that require practicum students to drive for agency business should verify that the agency’s liability insurance policy covers practicum students transporting clients in an Agency approved vehicle.  Students are NOT allowed to transport clients in their own personal vehicles.  Practicum students are informed that agencies requiring driving/transporting of clients may also require the student to submit to a Motor Vehicles Records check, and comply with all driving and client transportation policies of the Agency.

Minnesota State University, Mankato and the Department shall not be responsible for managing any requirements for transportation as part of practicum; does not maintain insurance for practicum student’s driving or transporting clients in association with their practicum; and does not vouch for the student’s driving record or valid driving license.

Adopted by Department Faculty: March 2, 2011

CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK POLICY

Professional social workers are increasingly required to undergo criminal background checks, minor and vulnerable adult maltreatment checks, and/or drug tests for field practicum placements and employment. The implications of having a criminal record of felonies, gross misdemeanors, misdemeanors and/or arrests may negatively impact future professional licensure and employment opportunities in the social work field. Additionally, substantiated complaints of maltreatment against minors and vulnerable adults could preclude field placement and/or employment in setting related to those populations. Therefore, students are required by the Department to complete a criminal background check prior to entering field education courses. In some instances, specific agencies may require students to complete additional background checks, which may also include drug testing. Supplementary costs associated with these additional requirements MAY be the responsibility of the student and ARE NOT covered by the department. Additionally, any accusation, arrest, or conviction of criminal behavior that occurs after the background check or during the program, must be reported immediately to the Field Director. Failure to report any accusation, arrest, or conviction of criminal behavior that occurs after the background check, or during the program, may result in delay or termination of a field practicum placement.

Since legal convictions may have implications for field placements, students are required to discuss past and current concerns with the Field Director during the placement process. This information will allow the Field Director to effectively provide the student with guidance on the impact on their field placement and future professional employment. Some legal accusations, arrests, or convictions may limit placement options or disqualify a student from being able to be placed. It is important to comply with the required timelines set for background checks and/or agency requests as failure may result in delay and/or denial into Field Practicum and Seminar courses.

Agencies and field instructors assume risk when hosting a student for their field placement. It is important for the agency to make informed decisions about students they are accepting to work under the social work license of their field instructor. Therefore, it is the Departments policy to disclose student criminal background information if it is returned with disqualifying evidence which includes felonies, gross misdemeanors and/or misdemeanors. The Field Director may request further documentation, request to meet with the student, ask the student to submit a written explanation of the information reported on their background check, and/or request any other information considered necessary by the program.

The student is expected to take the initiative to discuss background check results with the agency and Field Instructor. The Field Director will communicate with the agency and field instructor regarding background check results. In this case, the agency has final decision-making power based on any background information they receive, as to whether they will accept the student for placement.

Draft: August 23, 2007; Revised and Adopted: October 10, 2007; Revised and Adopted: March 1, 2012; Revised and Adopted: March 27, 2013; Revised and Adopted: September 6, 2017

INCLEMENT WEATHER POLICY

Most practicum sites are located in Southern and Central Minnesota and inclement weather should be expected. Students may use the following to gain information regarding travel to and/or from their home or practicum site:

  • The Statewide Road Conditions and Weather number 1-800-542-0220 or at click here for their website.
  • Local radio stations for school closings and early dismissals.

If the student is at the practicum site and the weather conditions create unsafe road conditions, the agency field instructor should be consulted. If a student is delayed by weather from leaving home, they should immediately contact their agency field instructor and negotiate an arrival time. Once at the practicum site, the student is permitted to leave early, take advantage of the agency’s overnight hospitality, or make other accommodations to stay overnight should weather become problematic. The student and field instructor should always consider safety in making any travel plans during the course of the workday. Students traveling long distances for seminar attendance should use the same consideration as used for travel to or from field practicum sites. All students are expected to read and comply with the [PDF] University Emergency Closing Policy (164 KiB)

DISTRACTION & TECHNOLOGY USE POLICY

The purpose of seminar and practicum is learning through educational interaction with the field seminar liason and others. In order to fulfill that purpose and to help students develop professional behavior that extends beyond the classroom, the Department of Social Work has developed a policy on Distraction and Use of Personal Technology in the classroom. All students are expected to read and comply with the policy stipulated in the BSSW Program Student Handbook. MSW students are expected to read policy stipulated in the MSW Program Graduate Student Handbook.

Social media may allow and support many useful professional learning opportunities during field practicum, however it also presents many potential challenges. If a field agency already has a social media policy in place it should be shared with the student during the orientation period. If the field agency does not have a formal social media policy the student should follow the NASW Code of Ethics related to the use of social media. It is expected that students will not access personal social media sites during field practicum hours.

BSSW students are expected to comply with the Department of Social Work Social Media Guidelines stipulated in the BSSW Program Student Handbook. MSW Students are expected to comply with the Department of Social Work Social Media Guidelines stipulated in the MSW Program Graduate Student Handbook.

 

ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

All students are expected to read and comply with the [PDF] Academic Honesty Policy (193 KiB) stipulated in the University Policy.

 

STUDENT SAFETY POLICY

The NASW has policies and guidelines to address safety in the workplace. You can review the entire policy at the following link: NASW Guidelines on Social Work Safety in the Workplace

When engaging with individuals, families, and the community social work students are expected to know, understand, and to follow their field placement policies and procedures, the MSU Student Statement of Responsibilities, and the Policy on Safety in this manual. Safety in field education should be taken seriously. Familiarizing oneself with sources and types of danger and practicing how to address a potentially unsafe situations can reduce risk to the student and to clients. High-risk settings for volatile clients may include but not limited to:

  • A client under the influence of a substance or withdrawing from a substance
  • A client with a previous history of physical, emotional, impulsive, or threatening behaviors
  • A client who is involuntarily receiving services, such as in an in-patient mental health or substance abuse setting.
  • A client who is experiencing psychosis, paranoia, delusions, or hallucinations
  • A client who does not respect or resents a person in an authority role
  • A client who is a perpetrator of partner violence who wants to know the whereabouts of their partner
  • A client who possesses and is not afraid to use weapons.

There is potential for harm towards social workers in any setting and may occur even if there is rapport with a client. It is important to have interventions in place to ensure safety. Safety practices may include but not limited to:

  • Remain calm and use respectful language.
  • Knowing how to deescalate a client when they become angry, emotionally charged, or feel threatened.
  • Intervene as early as possible in a high-risk situation.
  • Communicate with a field instructor or other trusting agency staff when you arrive to a potentially high-risk client’s home and when you leave.
  • Inform the field instructor or other agency staff of a meeting with a potentially high-risk client in the office, so that they can be alert to any changes in your meeting space.
  • Create an escape plan and carry a cell phone.
  • Ensure you are positioned in a non-threatening stance and be aware of your non-verbal communication with clients.
  • Position yourself close to an exit.
  • Use active listening and empathy.
  • Contact law enforcement or others who may arrive to assist.
  • Cooperate with law enforcement.

Procedure for Addressing Safety:

  1. Students and Field Instructors need to review agency safety policies and procedures at the beginning of the internship.
  2. Students are expected to follow agency procedures to ensure their safety and their clients’ safety.
  3. Following an incident that involves a threat to student safety, the student should document the situation and report this immediately to your field instructor and field seminar liaison to debrief the occurrence.

 

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AND NONDISCRIMINATION IN EDUCATION POLICY

Statement of Non-Discrimination Policy

Pursuant to the 1B.1 Equal Opportunity & Nondiscrimination in Employment and Education Policy and 1B.3 Sexual Violence Policy, the University and Department of Social Work is committed to providing equal education opportunities to all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, creed, religion, age, national origin, disability, marital status, status with regard to public assistance, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. Complaints of discrimination, discriminatory harassment, sexual harassment, and sexual violence are to be filed with:

Office of Equal Opportunity & Title IX
112 Armstrong Hall
Minnesota State University, Mankato
Mankato, MN 56001
Phone: 507-389-2986
(800) 627-352 or 711 (MRS/TTY)
Email: eotitleix@mnsu.edu
Website: www.mnsu.edu/eotitleix

Procedure for Addressing Harassment and Discrimination

Students experiencing harassment:

  1. Notify your Field Instructor and Field Seminar Liaison about the harassment immediately. If the harasser is the Field Instructor, notify the Field Seminar Liaison. Do not delay.
  2. Keep a written record for the specific dates, times, places, social media verification, witnesses, and the nature of every event of the harassment.
  3. As per University Policy, any complaints for harassment and/or discrimination made to Department faculty will be reported to the Office of Equal Opportunity & Title IX to provide guidance and resources to students.

    Student has the right to directly report any incident to the Office of Equal Opportunity & Title IX.

 

Agency Personnel Experience harassment from student and/or University Personnel:

  1. Notify Field Seminar Liaison about the harassment immediately. Do not delay.
  2. Keep a written record for the specific dates, times, places, witnesses, and the nature of every event of the harassment.
  3. As per University Policy, any complaints for harassment and/or discrimination made to Department faculty will be reported to the Office of Equal Opportunity & Title IX to provide guidance and resources.

    Any harassment or discrimination complaints can also be reported directly report to the Office of Equal Opportunity & Title IX.

PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES POLICY

In accordance with University Policy, the Department of Social Work is committed to ensuring equal educational opportunity and full participation for qualified persons with disabilities as is legally required under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 including section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. All students with a disability may request accommodation for classroom and field practicum through the Office of Accessibility Resources. This request must be made prior to the beginning of field practicum. Visit the Office of Accessibility Resources at 132 Memorial Library or call 507-389-2825 (V/TTY). Student disability accommodations will be made by faculty based upon the advisement of the Office of Accessibility Resources. Please refer to the BSSW Program Student Handbook or MSW Program Graduate Student Handbook for entire “Access for Student with Disabilities” Policy.

 

GRIEVANCE POLICY

Grievance procedures have been developed for the use of students and faculty. The procedures are designed to deal with disagreements that may develop. The students may grieve any decision made that will affect the student’s outcome for practicum and seminar. BSSW students should follow the step-by-step procedure that is outlined in the BSSW Student Handbook. MSW students should follow the step-by step procedure that is outlined in the [PDF] MSW Program Graduate Student Handbook (594 KiB).

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR SELECTION OF FIELD AGENCIES AND FIELD INSTRUCTORS

LOCATING PLACEMENT SITES

FIELD SITE SELECTION

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF FIELD PLACEMENT AGENCIES

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF FIELD INSTRUCTORS

FIELD INSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

 

LOCATING PLACEMENT SITES

The Field Directors will maintain a computerized database of sites within a 150-mile radius of Minnesota State University, Mankato. New potential practicum placements are initiated, developed, and added to the database each semester. Agencies may come to the attention of the Field Directors and Department faculty through contacts in the community, student interests, and/or by the agency contacting the Department of Social Work and expressing their interest in beginning a practicum site. Agencies are screened to assure their willingness to abide by Department goals and policies, to provide significant learning assignments, and to provide the appropriate level of field instruction. The database may be used to locate and explore sites that meet the student’s learning objectives. Students are welcome to submit information about other sites for consideration inclusion in this database.

Placements outside the 150-mile radius may be made under special circumstances. There are cost, supervision, travel, and seminar issues that must be considered with out of state placements. BSSW students are encouraged to discuss any plan of that nature with the Field Director a year or two prior to admission into practicum. MSW students should request exceptions to the policy at the minimum three months in advance of placements. These placement requests will be considered due to unique opportunities for students that are not available in a more immediate setting. Students requesting such a placement should also understand there may be additional financial responsibilities for facilitating such a placement such as transportation for the field seminar liaison to make site visit.

FIELD SITE SELECTION

While every effort will be made to meet the individual student placement wishes, factors influencing a solidified placement include an agency’s availability, CSWE requirements for appropriate field instruction, and other administrative issues will influence the final placement decision. Field placement settings will be selected to ensure that students achieve the goals of each Program, including CSWE Core Competencies. In addition, field placements in rural and small communities will be encouraged to afford students the opportunity to integrate and apply generalist or advanced generalist knowledge, values, skills, and cognitive and affective processes that involve rural social work practice.

Placements are negotiated between the student, the Field Directors, and the agency. The placement is based on the student’s practice interests, educational goals, and the availability of agencies that are able to assist in meeting these goals. The agency has the authority to accept or deny a student for placement. This decision is based on agency availability and interest, the information provided by the student and the Field Director, and the interview between the student and field instructor(s) and/or other agency staff). The student also has the right to accept or decline any invitation for placement from an agency. The Field Director has the final authority for approval of all practicum placements.

Practicum sites are evaluated by the students at the end of the practicum. This information, along with the experience the Field Director has with the agency, is used to determine whether a site will be retained on the database. Agencies may also opt to remove themselves from the database or to ask that no students be placed for specified lengths of time. Periodically, feedback will be provided back to agencies as evaluations from students are aggregated to provide a general review of all practicum sites. Aggregated data is used to protect student anonymity.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF FIELD PLACEMENT AGENCIES

Field education settings will be selected to ensure that students achieve the goals of the BSSW and MSW program, including CSWE Competencies and Behaviors.

Criteria for selection of field agencies include:

  • Established policies and procedures for service delivery.
  • Opportunity for students to practice generalist and advanced generalists social work roles.
  • Ability for students to achieve the goals of the BSSW and MSW Program, including Competencies and Behaviors/Advanced Behaviors.
  • Operates with the NASW Code of Ethics and values.
  • Provides a field instructor who possesses appropriate credentials for the level of study. (See appropriate level in Criteria for Selection of Field Instructors). If that is not available, the agency agrees that an Off-site Field Instructor will provide additional field instruction.
  • Provision of services are well developed and maintained without the reliance of student interns.
  • Allow sufficient time for Field Instructor to provide effective supervision.
  • Allow time for Field Instructors to attend conferences or trainings on field instruction.
  • Provide appropriate accommodations for effective student learning (i.e., work space, computer access, etc.).
  • Complete and submit the “Memorandum of Agreement for Student Training Experience/Internship” every five years. Should an agency require a special contract please contact the Field Coordinators/Director to start process prior to placement.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF FIELD INSTRUCTORS

Preparing students to begin professional careers in social work requires a combined effort of the community and social work educators. Field Instructors are a valuable component of the success of social work education. Therefore, the selection and preparation of field instructors is of paramount importance. Preparation for the role of a field instructor may be necessary particularly if field instruction is a new role. Therefore, the field education program will provide free, ongoing field instructor training and resources to support and grow quality field instructors for students.

Criteria for selection of Field Instructors include:

  • Appropriately degreed Agency Field Instructor for BSSW student must have a BSSW or MSW degree from a CSWE-accredited program and two (2) years post-social work degree practice experience in social work;
  • Appropriately degreed Field Instructor for MSW student must have a MSW degree from a CSWE-accredited program. Additionally, it is preferred that the individual has a minimum of two years postgraduate professional social work experience.
  • Appropriately degreed Agency Field Instructor for MSW student must have a MSW degree from a CSWE-accredited program and two (2) years post-social work degree practice experience in social work;
  • For cases in which an agency field instructor does not hold a CSWE-accredited social work degree or does not have the required experience, the program assumes responsibility for reinforcing the social work perspective by assigning an off-site field instructor;
  • Both BSSW and MSW preferred at least one year at the current agency;
  • Preferred both BSSW and MSW must possess a MN social work license for non-county workers; (Field Instructors do not have to possess a supervisory license from the state.)
  • Submit current curriculum vitae, resume or verification of licensure;
  • Ability to complete yearly field instructor training;
  • Demonstrate the desire to teach and demonstrate appropriate skills in practice;
  • Must be available and present to student when they are at the practicum site or provide appropriate replacement for guidance of students’ day to day tasks and responsibilities;
  • Have interest and time to provide effective weekly field instruction for the students;
  • Adhere to the professional code of ethics and values;
  • Ability to provide constructive feedback and written evaluations for students’ Learning Contract

FIELD INTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) requires that students be provided field instruction by an appropriately credentialed field instructor while in their practicum placements. Field instructors are encouraged to provide approximately one (1) hour per week of formal field instruction. This may be delivered in a group and/or by individual meetings with students. Additionally, informal consultations may be needed to assist students. Field instructor will provide administrative structure and field instruction. The Field instructor may also make reading assignments regarding specific populations, techniques, and/or other social work information and resources.

In situations where no appropriately degreed field instructor exists in the agency the Field Director will identify an appropriately degreed social worker from the community or a faculty member to provide the required off-site field instruction.

When an off-site field instructor is assigned, they will be provided the student’s name, resume, and agency placement. The agency field instructor will be provided with the name of the off-site field instructor and other information relevant to the provision of field instruction. Both the off-site field instructor and the agency field instructor will assist with development of Learning Contract, sign the Learning Contract and provide input for evaluations. On-going contact, consultation, and discussion of the student’s work, while encouraged, is left at their discretion.

Case presentations by the student and consultation with the off-site field instructor will provide the foundation for the field instruction. The nature of the off-site field instruction will focus on discussion of student experiences of applying social work principles, theory, practice methodology, and professional growth while providing direct and indirect social work services.

 

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POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR PRACTICUM PLACEMENT

CHILD WELFARE TITLE IVE PROGRAM

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH WORKFORCE EDUCATION AND TRAINING GRANT

BSSW POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR PLACEMENT

MSW POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR PLACEMENT

 

CHILD WELFARE TITLE IVE PROGRAM

Participation in either the Undergraduate or Graduate Child Welfare Program (CWP) requires that students complete field practicum in a child welfare setting that meets the requirements for their respective program. The following guidelines are for consideration in the planning process for participants in the CWP. Should any questions arise, please communicate with the appropriate BSSW or MSW Child Welfare Program Coordinator.

Guidelines for CWP Placement Process:

  • Field placements are arranged through the BSSW Coordinators or the MSW Field Director who may consult with the CWP Coordinators to clarify any questions related to placement.
  • CWP students must meet with CWP Coordinator prior to meeting with Field Director to discuss options for appropriate field placements.
  • CWP students will complete their practicum in a county or tribal child welfare setting with the exception of a CWP student in the two-year MSW program. In this case, that student may be placed in any child or family related setting in their first year of the program and the county and tribal child welfare setting in their second year.
  • Placements with specific counties, tribes, or state offices are not guaranteed although efforts will be made to satisfy student preferences.
  • When completing the Learning Contract and subsequent assignments, all CWP students are responsible for relating their work to child welfare clients and programs in order to comply with program participation.
  • All CWP students should participate in the Minnesota Department of Human Services Foundation Training. This training may be included in the CWP student’s Learning Contract. CWP are required to communicate their attendance of this training to their field instructor.
    • BSSW students complete Classroom One training and the online modules.
    • MSW students complete Classroom Two and Three and all online modules.
    • Classroom training count toward field hours; the online modules do not.

 

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH WORKFORCE EDUCATION AND TRAINING GRANT

The following guidelines are additional requirements for MSW students and agencies that are participants in the Southern Minnesota Behavioral Health Initiative grant. Student, agencies and Field Instructors are expected to meet MSW program expectation outlined in field manual as well as the following:

  • Emphasis on behavioral healthcare across the lifespan;
  • Focus on serving persons in rural, vulnerable, and/or underserved communities in an integrated primary care setting;
  • Experiential learning opportunities with client systems;
  • Use of empirically supported interventions or evidence-based models of practice;
  • Enhanced instruction and supervision of students;
  • Opportunities for participation in integrated or interprofessional teams;
  • When completing the Learning Contract and subsequent assignments, all grantees are responsible for relating their work to integrated behavioral health.

 

BSSW POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR PLACEMENT

HOUR REQUIREMENTS

OUT OF AREA POLICY

REGISTRATION POLICY

FIELD PLACEMENT AT EMPLOYMENT POLICY

ATTENDANCE & PARTICIPATION POLICY

READNESS FOR FIELD POLICY

PRACTICUM PLACEMENT PROCEDURES

 

HOUR REQUIREMENTS

BSSW students are required to complete a minimum of 440-hours in practicum. Students are typically in the practicum setting Monday through Thursday for approximately 32 hours each week, for 15 weeks during the fall or spring semester. Practicum is designed for continuity of services across a full semester and students are expected to begin the first day of classes and conclude the last class day of the semester (exceptions for this must be approved by the field director).

During the semester, students should be at the practicum site the hours the agency operates or as agreed upon by the student and the field instructor. In almost all instances, the University calendar governs the days students are at the agency. A few students, however, will find it necessary to negotiate the variance of University and the Agency's calendars, for instance when the University is on Spring Break. During exam week, students will not be at the placement site except by special arrangement between the student, the field instructor, and the field seminar liaison.

Students who may have difficulty completing their practicum requirements in one semester should communicate this concern to the Field Director as soon as possible. The Field Director is able to work with the student in order to meet the student’s needs and the Department’s requirements. Any adjustments to the time frame are exceptions and require prior approval from the Field Director the Agency Field Instructor.

OUT OF AREA POLICY

BSSW students should plan to complete SOWK 455: Senior Practicum within a 150-mile radius of Minnesota State University, Mankato. In rare instances, a student may request to complete a practicum outside of 150-miles. Students will need to complete a letter of request explaining reasons why and submit it to the BSSW Program Director at least one year prior to enrolling in practicum. The student must be aware of the additional expenses for site visits by the field faculty may be their responsibility (including mileage, airfare, and accommodations as necessary). Exceptions to this policy must be related to one or more of the following justifications:

  • Significant change in personal and/or family responsibilities
  • Significant economic/financial need
  • Location of primary residence outside of the 150 miles
  • Access to practice experiences that is significantly different from those available within the 150-mile radius.

REGISTRATION POLICY

Students will receive Departmental permission to register for SOWK 455: Practicum and SOWK 450: Integrative Seminar. Any student has the right to drop either course following the University policy for course changes. Since the BSSW program requires that these courses be taken together, a student may not elect to keep one and drop the other. A student does have the right to withdraw (W) from these courses, however doing so may affect academic opportunities related to financial aid, graduation, and continuation in the program. Other considerations include the impact on agency services, clients and client systems, and the BSSW Program relationship with the agency for future placements. A plan for withdrawal (W) must be developed and implemented carefully in order to minimize the impact on these relationships.

The Department reserves the right to deny any student who delays the application process or the agency placement process as it is the student’s responsibility to ensure they are following the appropriate practicum placement process.

FIELD PLACEMENT AT EMPLOYMENT POLICY

The BSSW Program follows the standards established by Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) that clearly state that the student’s practicum experience and supervision must be different from the student’s employment. Students must communicate this request with the field director as soon as possible.

The field director will make every attempt to work with the student and the agency if the student requests to complete the practicum requirement at their place of employment. The following conditions must be satisfied in order to have a successful placement:

  • Practicum assignments must be within a different unit/division/department than that of the employment.
  • The student must be assigned a field instructor who does not supervise their employment.
  • The agency must provide release time for the practicum.
  • All documents and meetings related to field practicum at place of employment must be fully completed by required due dates for placement.

ATTENDANCE & PARTICIPATION POLICY

Students are required to maintain documentation of practicum hours. If students are absent from the practicum for reasons beyond their control (illness, family death, weather, etc.) the student must notify the Field Instructor as soon as possible and provide the reasons for the absence or tardiness. When a student is absent for three or more days at their practicum site for reasons outside of practicum related events, or if the student starts to develop a pattern of absences, the field instructor and/or the student should communicate with the field seminar liaison as soon as possible.

Active engagement and participation in field practicum is critical for successful completion. Students are expected to take initiative as appropriate, to practice prompt regular attendance, to exhibit attentive, professional nonverbal behavior, to provide and receive feedback, to offer support, and to prepare materials in advance. Students should expect to participate in a variety of activities.

READNESS FOR FIELD POLICY

Admitting students to practicum is the responsibility of the BSSW Director of Field Education and faculty of the BSSW Program. The responsibility is to assure that each social work student who graduates from Minnesota State University, Mankato has demonstrated mastery of the Competencies and Behaviors as outlined by Council on Social Work Education, along with meeting the goals and outcomes for Minnesota State University, Mankato, the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, and the BSSW Program. Social Work Course 450: Integrative Seminar and Social Work Course 455: Practicum are never waived for any reason.

The purpose of this policy is to support the success of a student in completing a field practicum placement, and to be able to meet the needs of our community partners and clients. The field program strives to ensure social work students are well prepared for a successful practicum experience.

The field director will assess the student’s ability to demonstrate the capacity for professional behavior, ethical conduct, professional communication skills, self-awareness and critical thinking. This assessment begins when a student attends the field orientation meeting, and may incorporate feedback from the Department of Social Work faculty, and agency contacts as a student progresses through the field placement process. Typically, the assessment process will end when a student begins their field placement. Students will be rating using the following scale:

    0 – No evidence for concern; student will automatically continue the field placement process.

    1 – Evidence of minor concern; student will be monitored and assessed for a continued problematic pattern of behaviors.

    2 – Evidence of concern; student will need an immediate meeting with the field director to develop a plan of action.


If a student presents behaviors that score a level of concern rating of a “2”, the program is concerned about the student’s capacity to successfully complete a field search and/or field practicum, and the student will be required to meet immediately with the field director. A student may be suspended from the field placement process while concerns are being addressed. The field director may consult the faculty regarding the plan of action developed for any student who is not prepared to begin practicum.

In addition to the readiness for field assessment, students who have applied for practicum must meet all the BSSW Program requirements to begin practicum including documentation of successful completion of prior coursework. Completion of all required general education courses and all required social work courses (with the grade of C- or better, or a Passing grade when applicable) is a prerequisite to SOWK 450 and SOWK 455. A student must receive an overall final rating of a “3” or higher with no ratings at a “1” or “0” for any rating scale item in their SOWK 315: Junior Field Experience. This evaluation and the narrative evaluation must reflect the student’s appropriateness for the social work profession. In order to enroll in SOWK 450 and SOWK 455, all incompletes (IC), in progresses (IP), or any other unmet social work curriculum requirements must be met. Permission to register is granted by Departmental consent.

Lastly, students can be denied the right to enter field placement if they fail three placement interviews. If the student has attended three interviews with potential agencies and has been denied a practicum at all three of the agencies, the student automatically moves to a level 2 of concern. Each student’s circumstances will be considered on an individual basis and plans will be developed to meet their distinct needs.

PRACTICUM PLACEMENT PROCEDURES

Students admitted to SOWK 455: Social Work Practicum, should note the following paragraphs are presented sequentially and include steps for the student and the Field Director. Compliance to this sequence of steps is critical. Students must adhere to this process if they intend to begin their practicum in a timely fashion. At times, the placement process may not represent the needs of every agency; therefore, flexibility and adaptability are sometime necessary.

  1. Orientation – The Field Director will schedule a SOWK 455: Practicum Orientation with students to review the placement process and procedures in detail including the field database system, respond to any questions or concerns the students may have, and formally begin the placement process. Students will be required to attend this orientation before they are able to apply for admission to practicum. Notice of the orientation dates and due dates for the application materials will be posted on the social work bulletin boards, email, and will be announced in SOWK 443. Missing this meeting will delay the placement process. If it is impossible to attend this meeting for any reasons, please notify the Field Director as soon as possible.
  2. Intent to Register – The application for admission to SOWK 455: Social Work Practicum is to be completed during the semester prior to enrollment. The field director will establish due dates for applications for fall and spring semesters and notify students of due dates through the Sonia database, MSU email, and will be announced in social work courses. If forms are not completed by the given due dates, students may delay the placement process.

    Students submit all application materials on the field education database, Sonia. These materials are reviewed by the BSSW Director of Field Education and they will assist to determine an appropriate field placement for each student.

    The following forms are required to be completed and electronically signed, if applicable, by the student before the initial meeting with the Field Director:

    1. BSSW Practicum Application.
    2. BSSW Professional Statements.
    3. BSSW Professional Commitment.
    4. An uploaded, updated resume.
    5. An uploaded sample cover letter.
    6. An uploaded academic record (transcript, not DARS).
    7. The Field Director will also review the SOWK 315: Junior Field Experience course Learning Contract and Evaluation on Sonia.
    8. Student preferencing of potential field placements.
  3. : Students are encouraged to utilize the services offered by the Career Development Center (CDC). The CDC has staff that work with students to develop and review a professionally prepared resume, cover letters, and thank-you notes. More information can be located at http://www.mnsu.edu/cdc/.

    Students are asked to think carefully about their learning goals as they begin to consider practicum opportunities. Applicants will preference possible practicum sites through the field database, Sonia

    after they attend the SOWK 455: Practicum Orientation Meeting. Once a student has submitted their agency preferences in Sonia, the field director will begin the placement process. When students are considering placement opportunities they should not contact any of the practicum placements without prior permission of the field director.

  4. Field Interview – Students are informed in the SOWK 455: Practicum Orientation that individual student interviews will be scheduled with the field director at the beginning of the semester prior to their field placement. Meeting timeslots are allotted to students through Sonia and students will schedule meetings with the field director. If students are not able to meet with the field director with the given timeframe, it is the student’s responsibility to communicate this with the field director to arrange an alternative meeting option.
  5. Submitting Materials to the Agency – The field director will notify the student when an agency is willing to be a practicum site. At that point, the field director will instruct the student on how to proceed with the agency. This may include the student sending their documents, completing a separate application through the practicum agency, and scheduling an interview with the potential agency.
  6. Communication with the Field Director – The student will report to the field director the date and time of the scheduled interview and apprise them of the outcome of the interview. Students may interview at more than one agency, however the competition for placements exists not only with one’s student colleagues from Minnesota State University, Mankato, but also from other colleges and universities.
  7. Student liability insurance and background check requirement – At approximately mid-term the semester prior to placement, the field director will send out an email to students instructing them to purchase student liability insurance and apply for a criminal background check. The field director will inform students of timelines and due dates for these requirements. Both the student liability insurance and a background check are to be completed prior to the student beginning their practicum.
  8. Finalization of the Practicum – Students will send a thank–you letter to the each interviewer regardless of the outcome of the interview. If the student interview goes well and all parties (field director, student, field instructor) agree that a placement will be a mutually beneficial, the student and field instructor will complete the Field Practicum Placement Agreement on Sonia to finalize the placement. The field director will also ensure the appropriate Memorandum of Agreement is active between the University and the field practicum site prior to student beginning practicum.

MSW POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR PLACEMENT

HOUR REQUIREMENTS

OUT OF AREA POLICY

REGISTRATION POLICY

FIELD PLACEMENT AT EMPLOYMENT POLICY

ATTENDANCE & PARTICIPATION POLICY

READNESS FOR FIELD PRACTICUM POLICY

RESUME AND COVER LETTER ASSISTANCE FOR STUDENTS

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP & LIABILITY INSURANCE

PRACTICUM PLACEMENT PROCEDURES

 

HOUR REQUIREMENTS

The field education program is conceptualized to accommodate students’ schedules by spreading the required hours across spring and summer semesters, in both the foundation and specialization years, concurrent with coursework. The Council on Social Work Education specifies that students must complete a minimum total of 900 hours of fieldwork. The following table indicates how students will be meeting that requirement:

    

Students accrue field education hours for SOWK 615-625 as follows:

Students accrue field education hours for SOWK 665-675 as follows:  

Foundation field practicum is scheduled for 20 hours per week for 15 weeks in the spring semester and 16 hours per week for 10 weeks in the summer semester. Specialization field practicum is scheduled for 20 hours per week for 15 weeks in the spring semester and 20 hours per week for 10 weeks in the summer semester. A plan for accruing hours will be determined by the student and Field Instructor. Very few agencies offer paid practicums and rarely will weekend and night hours be offered due to the lack of field instruction opportunities.

Students who may have difficulty completing their practicum requirements in the planned time frame should communicate this to the Field Director as soon as possible, in writing. The Field Director may be able to work with the student to meet the student’s needs and the Department’s requirements. Any adjustments to the time frame are exceptions and require prior approval of the Field Director and the Agency Field Instructor.

OUT OF AREA POLICY

Students should plan to complete Social Work Practicum, SOWK 615/625 and SOWK 665/675 within a 150 mile radius of Minnesota State University, Mankato. Students must request an exception to MSW Field Education policy regarding SOWK 615/625 or SOWK 665/675, if a plan for the field sequence is beyond the 150 mile radius.

Requests for exceptions to this policy must be related to one or more of the following justifications:

  • Significant change in personal and/or family responsibilities
  • Significant economic/financial need
  • Location of primary residence outside of the 150 miles
  • Access to practice experiences that is significantly different from those available within the 150 mile radius.

This request for an exception must be presented in writing three months in advance, for review on a case-by-case basis, by the MSW faculty. The student making this request must also present a written plan which demonstrates that the concurrent courses and related activities and/or field instruction responsibilities for these courses can be met. In addition to their own increased travel expenses, students must be aware that additional expenses for site visits by the field faculty will be their responsibility (including mileage, airfare, and accommodations as necessary).

Adopted by MSW Faculty: January 30, 2008

REGISTRATION POLICY

Students register in the fall and spring semesters for SOWK 615/625 and SOWK 665/675. Practicum and Seminar (SOWK 615/625 & SOWK 665-675) occur in the spring and summer semesters. Any variation from the established field program must be discussed with the Field Director, the student’s academic advisor, and the Field Instructor. Due to the time required to negotiate practicum placements, pre-planning is critical and begins the fall semester before the actual practicum begins. Delaying the planning process may result in a placement not being available. Missing field placement deadlines during placement process and/or waiting until the beginning of the spring semester to begin practicum placement discussions is not permitted. Withdrawal from a planned placement will affect continuation in the program. Other considerations include the impact, particularly after the semester has begun, on agency services, the consumers, and the Department of Social Work’s relationship with the agency for future practicum placements. A plan for beginning late or withdrawing must be carefully considered, developed, and implemented.

FIELD PLACEMENT AT EMPLOYMENT POLICY

The Department is strongly committed to ensuring that students assume the role of learner in order for them to achieve their learning goals in field settings. The Department also recognizes that some students have personal economic situations that make it necessary for them to explore field opportunities that can provide final assistance including at their place of employment. Even though the Department does not encourage placement at employment, if a student desires to do one practicum at their place of employment, they will be allowed to pursue such an arrangement.

The student will need to apply for this field practicum through a separate process defined in procedures for practicum placement section of Field Manual. The purpose of using a separate process is to establish that specific criteria in policy have been established. For the student, it clearly indicates that there must be unique learning opportunities and that these must be separate and distinct from their current employment. For the agencies, the process designates that the student must assume the role of a learner and that the agency will need to create an environment for educational objectives to be fulfilled. Finally, the process provides clarity to the Field Director as to the specific generalist/advanced generalist assignments that will be accomplished. Requests will be assessed case-by-case and are not guaranteed for approval until the end of the placement process.

The following criteria must be satisfied:

  • Students are only allowed to do only one practicum at their place of employment.
  • The agency must meet the same criteria and expectations for a field practicum site as for all other sites to be able to achieve foundation or specialization practicum objectives as outlined in Criteria for Selection of Agency Settings.
  • Student must be assigned a Field Instructor, preferably an MSW, who does not currently supervise, or previously supervised, their employment. The Field Instructor must meet the same criteria as other Field Instructors outlined in Criteria for Selection of Field Instructor section.
  • If a MSW Field Instructor is not available, a Master’s level (preferred) Agency Field Instructor will be utilized. The agency must agree to the use of an ‘off-site’ MSW Field Instructor to “reinforce a social work perspective” (CSWE, 2020).
  • Student must have practicum assignments that are fundamentally different from their current or past job assignments and that expand their professional social work skills and knowledge. A fundamentally different learning environment could be established by two or more of the following:
    1. change of unit/department within the agency;
    2. change in client population served;
    3. assignments are different social work interventions or special assignments.
  • Preferred that student has not completed a practicum at agency previously.
  • All documents and meetings related to field practicum at place of employment must be fully completed by required dates for placement.
  • Learning contract will have clearly delineated practicum assignments, tasks and/or responsibilities that are imbedded in Social Work Core Competencies. Only practicum assignments will count toward the requisite number of practicum hours.

Student should be aware that disruptions in employment may affect the student’s ability to complete the field practicum therefore affecting their ability to complete their degree. If a disruption occurs while the student is completing field practicum, an immediate review of the practicum placement will be conducted. Agency, Student, and Field Seminar Liaison must all agree for the practicum to continue at that agency. If such agreement does not exist, Field Seminar Liaison and Student will work with the Field Director to determine how to meet the practicum requirement. Depending on the circumstances of the disruption of employment, the situation may be addressed under the policies related to Ethical Behavior and/or those related to Practicum Completion.

ATTENDANCE & PARTICIPATION POLICY

Both practicums are designed for continuity of experiences across both semesters. Students are expected to begin the first day of classes and conclude the last class day of each semester as determined by the University calendar unless approved by the Field Instructor and Field Director. Students will not be expected to be at the placement site during spring break, University holidays, exam week, or between semesters except by arrangement between the student and the Field Instructor. Practicum sites may observe holidays not recognized by the University. Students can use these opportunities, as available, to accrue additional hours, participate in different agency experiences, attend trainings, and to provide continuous services to clients by agreement with their Field Instructor.

If students are absent from the practicum for reasons beyond their control (illness, family death, weather, etc.) the student must notify the Field Instructor as soon as possible and provide the reasons for the absence or tardiness. The student is responsible for initiating a plan for completion of hours with the Field Instructor. If a student has absent for one week or more (or an on-going pattern of absence) the Field Instructor and Student must notify the Field Seminar Liaison. A pattern of absence, tardiness, or incomplete hours can result in a grade of No Credit for SOWK 615/625 or SOWK 665/675.

Active engagement and participation in field practicum is critical for successful completion. Students are expected to take initiative as appropriate, to practice prompt regular attendance, to exhibit attentive, professional nonverbal behavior, to provide and receive feedback, to offer support, and to prepare materials in advance. Students should expect to participate in a variety of activities.

READNESS FOR FIELD PRACTICUM POLICY

Admitting students to practicum is the responsibility of the MSW Director of Field Education and faculty of the MSW Program. The responsibility is to assure that each social work student who graduates from Minnesota State University, Mankato has demonstrated mastery of the Competencies and Behaviors as outlined by Council on Social Work Education, along with meeting the goals and outcomes for Minnesota State University, Mankato, the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, and the MSW Program.

The purpose of this policy is to support the success of a student in completing a field practicum placement, and to be able to meet the needs of our community partners and clients. The field program strives to ensure social work students are well prepared for a successful practicum experience.

The field director will assess the student’s ability to demonstrate the capacity for professional behavior, ethical conduct, professional communication skills, self-awareness and critical thinking. This assessment begins when a student attends the field orientation meeting, and may incorporate feedback from the Department of Social Work faculty, and agency contacts as a student progresses through the field placement process. Typically, the assessment process will end when a student begins their field placement. Students will be rating using the following scale:

          0 - No evidence for concern; student will automatically continue the field placement process.

          1 - Evidence of minor concern; student will be monitored and assessed for a continued problematic pattern of behaviors.

          2 - Evidence of concern; student will need an immediate meeting with the field director to develop a plan of action.

If a student presents behaviors that score a level of concern rating of a “2”, the program is concerned about the student’s capacity to successfully complete a field search and/or field practicum, and the student will be required to meet immediately with the field director. A student may be suspended from the field placement process while concerns are being addressed. The field director may consult the faculty regarding the plan of action developed for any student who is not prepared to begin practicum.

In addition to the readiness for field assessment, students who have applied for practicum must meet all the MSW Program requirements to begin practicum including documentation of successful completion of prior coursework. Lastly, students can be denied the right to enter field placement if they fail three placement interviews. If the student has attended three interviews with potential agencies and has been denied a practicum at all three of the agencies, the student automatically moves to a level 2 of concern. Each student’s circumstances will be considered on an individual basis and plans will be developed to meet their distinct needs.

RESUME AND COVER LETTER ASSISTANCE FOR STUDENTS

Students are encouraged to utilize the services offered by the Career Development Center (CDC) prior to their interview with the Field Director. The CDC staff work with students to develop and review a professionally prepared vita, resume, cover letters, and thank-you notes. They are also available for other career development and job placement opportunities (e.g. interview preparation). More information can be located at http://www.mnsu.edu/cdc/

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP & LIABILITY INSURANCE

As an opportunity for enhancing professional identity and development, NASW membership is strongly encouraged for SOWK 615/625 and SOWK 665/675. Membership information can be obtained online at https://www.socialworkers.org/online-join/join.aspx

Liability insurance is required to be in place prior to beginning, and throughout, SOWK 615/625 and SOWK 665/675. Liability insurance purchased for work or provided by an employer may not substitute for student liability insurance. Student liability insurance will be purchased through the University by the Department. Copy of the liability insurance will be made available on SONIA. If students want or require more liability insurance, they are responsible to purchase additional student liability insurance.

PRACTICUM PLACEMENT PROCEDURES

Students admitted to social work practicum should note the following paragraphs are presented sequentially and include steps for the student and the Field Director. Compliance to this sequence of steps is critical. Students must adhere to this process if they intend to begin their practicum in a timely fashion. Additionally, students should review field policies that are related to field practicum placement prior to starting the procedure. Students may choose to confer with their academic advisor before applying for field practicum.

There are two processes outlined in the following pages: The first process, which most students will follow, is the standard field placement process. The second process is intended only for those students who are anticipating completing their practicum at their place of employment. At times, the placement process may not represent the needs of every agency; therefore, flexibility and adaptability are sometime necessary.

  1. Orientation - Student attends orientation to field. After attendance to the orientation, students are given access to the field database system, SONIA, to start applying for field.
  2. Intent to Register - All materials must be completed and submitted to the Field Director through the field database, SONIA, prior to signing up for field practicum interview. Materials include:
    • Professional Commitment (SOWK Appendix 2)
    • Intent to Register (MSW Appendix 1)
    • A copy of the student’s resume. This will be reviewed by potential Field Instructor.
    • If student is seeking placement at their place of employment must communicate that to the Field Director at this time. Additional documentation will be required.
    • If student is seeking placement outside of the 150-miles radius must request an exception to that policy at a minimum three months in advance. Additional documentation and financial responsibilities may be required.
  3. Preparation for Field Interview - Student will then sign up for individual interview with the Field Director to discuss interests in practicum placements, desired learning objectives, career goals and prior experience, etc.
    • Prior to interview, student are asked to think carefully about their learning goals and program objectives as they begin to consider practicum opportunities. While it is anticipated that public and private agencies will be utilized as they meet the specific learning goals of student, student will be encouraged to consider agencies in small and rural communities for placements.
    • Student are required to review and preference potential field practicum sites on SONIA.
    • Student are encouraged to submit other options for field placement that they believe will meet their learning goals on SONIA prior to the interview.
  4. Field Interview - Student will attend interview with Field Director. Student is responsible for making sure that paperwork and interview are completed by established due dates. If student fails to complete task by a due date they will not be able to move forward in the matching process.
  5. Initial Agency Contact - The Field Director will contact the agency and determine if they are interested in a practicum student, whether appropriate opportunities are available to meet the educational goals of the student, and whether appropriate field instruction is available within the agency.
    • Do not contact any of the practicum placements without prior permission of the Field Director. This is at the request of Agencies and potential Field Instructors. The initial contact is the responsibilities of the Field Director.
    • If it is a previously unused agency or student’s place of employment, the Field Director will orient the agency personnel to the Department of Social Work’s requirements for student placements.
    • If the agency is interested and can provide the required field instruction or is amenable to off-site field instruction, and the student appropriate task and assignments are available, the student will be notified.
  6. Cover Letter & Resume - Student will email a cover letter and resume to for potential field agency. Cover letter & Resume should be professionally written and developed.
  7. Placement Interview at Potential Agency - Once the resume and cover letter has been submitted to the potential agency, student will follow up with agency within three to five working days to set an appointment for an interview. It is the responsibility of the student to schedule the interview.
    • Agency personnel will be aware that you are sending materials. Delays will impact their continued interest in hosting a practicum student
    • The student must inform the Field Director of the date of set interview.
    • If the agency is interested and can provide the required field instruction or is amenable to off-site field instruction, and the student appropriate task and assignments are available, the student will be notified.
    • Student may interview at more than one agency, however the competition for placements exists not only with one’s student social work colleagues from MSU, M but also from other MSU, M departments and other colleges and universities. This can be particularly important to keep in mind in the urban areas. “Sitting” on potential placements is discouraged.
    • Agencies may also require that student complete agency volunteer applications, submit to an additional background check, or submit to required medical tests. Choosing not to honor those requests will impact placement.
    • The student must inform the Field Director of the interview outcome. In some cases agency personnel may also call the Field Director with feedback.
    • Students will send a thank you letter to the agency.
    • If an interview does not result in a field placement, the Field Director will then assist the student to make other contacts for placements.
  8. Finalization of the Practicum - If an interview does result in a field placement, the student will notify the agency and Field Director of their intent to accept the practicum placement.
    • Student will need to obtain and forward contact information for Field Instructor to Field Director
    • The Field Director will confirm the placement with the agency and attach the Field Practicum Acceptance Agreement on SONIA for the student and agency to sign.
    • The Field Director will follow up with Agency regarding Memorandum of Agreement form for review and obtain necessary signatures. Additionally, will make plans for orientation/ training and verification of credentials.
    • Student will need to attend preplacement orientation.
    • Student will be responsible for making sure that appropriate signatures are submitted on all placement forms prior to start of field practicum.
  9. Begin field placement following the University calendar.
    • At least two-weeks prior to beginning placement, the student will re-contact the agency, reminding them of the start date and reaffirming their commitment.
    • The practicum agency may have additional paperwork or requirements for the student to complete. Students will need to follow up with their field placement prior to placement regarding additional expectations.
    • Students liability insurance and back ground check must be completed before a student can start their field placement.
    • Student will complete off-site MSW Field Instructor Form (SOWK Appendix 6) if applicable.
    • Students will be provided a course syllabus and will follow the requirements stated on the syllabus.

Field Practicum at Place of Employment Procedures:

Students are asked to think carefully about their learning goals and program objectives as they begin to consider practicum opportunities at their place of employment. While a placement at one’s place of employment may be convenient, it may not offer the opportunities for expanded learning and experience another site might offer. Please review field policies regarding to field practicum at employment.

  1. Orientation - Student attends orientation to field. After attendance to the orientation, students are given access to the field database system, SONIA, to start applying for field.
  2. Intent to Register - All materials must be completed and submitted to the Field Director through the field database, SONIA, prior to signing up for field practicum interview. Materials include:
    • Professional Commitment (SOWK Appendix 2)
    • Intent to Register (MSW Appendix 1)
    • A copy of the student’s resume.
    • If student is seeking placement outside of the 150-miles radius must request an exception to that policy at a minimum three months in advance. Additional documentation and financial responsibilities may be required.
  3. Preparation for Field Interview - Student will then sign up for individual interview with the Field Director to discuss interests in practicum at place of employment, desired learning objectives, career goals and prior experience, etc.
    • Prior to interview, student is asked to think carefully about their learning goals and program objectives as they begin to consider practicum opportunities. They should explore opportunities for field placement at place of employment that meet their learning goals and the program objectives. Student will be encouraged to consider agencies in small and rural communities for placements.
    • If agency is not currently on the field database, the student will submit agency as a potential field practicum site on SONIA.
    • Student will complete site preference procedures in SONIA in case employment agency is not approved.
    • Additional agency documents can be uploaded onto SONIA that will assist Field Director in determining appropriateness of agency as field site.
  4. Field Interview - Student will then attend practicum interview with Field Director. Student is responsible for making sure that paperwork and interview are completed by established due dates. If student fails to complete task by due date they will not be able to move forward in the matching process.
    • Permission to move forward or not will be discussed with student utilizing documents provided. Information provided needs to clearly define the student’s current employment duties, what the student is proposing to do differently for practicum, and information on potential MSW field instructor.
    • Student will start completing the Field Practicum at Place of Employment (SOWK Appendix 5)
    • Once interview is complete and documents are in progress, Field Director will determine if student will be able to progress to the next step in the approval process.
  5. Placement Interview at Employment - Once approved to move forward, the student will schedule a time to meet to formally to discuss and develop a plan with administrator or Field Instructor who has the authority to arrange and approve placements (sometimes there is more than one person involved). Meeting will discuss:
    • Proposed duties, task, activities, or opportunities that could be used for practicum.
    • How student and agency will support student as learner and how position duties and tasks are related to core competencies and advanced behaviors.
    • How the student will be compensated; are the practicum hours on top of the regular 40 hours per week or will they be part of your regular schedule, is flex time or vacation available, can the student commit to working post-graduation for time engaged in practicum.
    • Whether a potential MSW Field Instructor, with 2 years post- MSW graduation experience, is available on-site. If that is not available the student will need to know if the agency is willing to agree to an Off-site Field Instructor. Agency field instructor (preferably a master’s level-prepared professional) will need to be provided if a MSW is not available. The person to provide field instruction at the agency will need to be identified prior to final Field Director approval of the placement.
    • If the proposal is accepted by the employer, then the student will contact the MSW Field Director to set up the final approval meeting between student, agency administrators, current supervisors and proposed field instructor, and field director.
    • If the proposal is not accepted by the employer, student will discuss next steps with field director.
  6. Finalization of the Practicum – Once approved, the final approval meeting will occur during site visit with Field Director, Field Instructor, agency administrator and student to finalize proposal, answer any outstanding questions, and finalize the placement.
    • Student will provide Field Director with contact information for agency administrator, current supervisor and potential field instructor.
    • Student will complete and submit Field Practicum at Place of Employment Form (SOWK Appendix 5)
    • Field Director will attach the Field Practicum Acceptance Agreement on SONIA for the student and agency to sign.
    • The Field Director will follow up with Agency regarding Memorandum of Agreement form for review and obtain necessary signatures. Additionally, will make plans for orientation/ training and verification of credentials.
    • Student will need to attend preplacement orientation.
    • Student will be responsible for making sure that appropriate signatures are submitted on all placement forms prior to start of field practicum.
  7. Begin placement following the University calendar
    • At least two-weeks prior to beginning placement, the student will work with agency to transition into new duties at the start date.
    • Student will complete off-site MSW Field Instructor Form (SOWK Appendix 5) if applicable.
    • Students will be provided a course syllabus and will follow the requirements stated on the syllabus.

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POLICIES AND INTEGRATION OF FIELD COURSES

BSSW POLICIES AND INTEGRATION OF PRACTICUM AND SEMINAR

MSW POLICIES AND INTEGRATION OF PRACTICUM AND SEMINAR

 

BSSW POLICIES AND INTEGRATION OF PRACTICUM AND SEMINAR

Attendance and Participation Policies

Integration of Field Courses

SOWK 450 and SOWK 455 assignments leading to capstone completion

Learning Contract

Evaluation and Grades

 

Attendance and Participation Policies

Attendance and engagement is critical for both SOWK 450: Integrative Seminar and SOWK 455: Practicum. It includes regular, on time attendance, awareness of nonverbal behavior, participation in discussions and group facilitation, small group exercises, practice activities, using critical thinking to build on and respond to the comments of others, and adhering to the NASW Code of Ethics.

Participation also includes appropriate attire while in practicum and when students are representing the agency within the community. Agency guidelines for physical appearance such as appropriate clothing, should be discussed with students prior to or at the beginning of their practicum experience. It is strongly recommended that students represent themselves through a professional lens and dress in a way that would be perceived professional. Casual attire is appropriate for seminar.

Seminar attendance is mandatory. Any disruption of seminar attendance may impact the continuation of the student’s practicum. Students should communicate directly with the field seminar liaison about any seminar absences they may anticipate throughout the semester as soon as possible. Each field seminar liaison has the discretion to determine what absences may be excused and will have a more specific definition of attendance and participation requirements in their individual course syllabus. Students are advised to read, understand, and follow the attendance and participation policies in their given section of SOWK 450.

Integration of Field Courses

Place in the BSSW Curriculum

SOWK 455: Practicum is taken in the final semester of a BSSW student’s academic career with the Minnesota State University, Mankato’s Department of Social Work. SOWK 450 must be taken concurrently with SOWK 455. These courses provide the final links between students’ academic learning in their general education/liberal arts sequence and the social work curriculum.

SOWK 455 is designed to provide the student the opportunity to fully engage in the field of social work, practicing all the knowledge, skills, values, and cognitive and affective processes learned throughout their courses in social work and from the liberal arts foundation. The primary purpose of SOWK 450 is to offer the student the opportunity for support and direction in practice. Second, it affords the student social worker a successful transition to that of generalist social work professional by the end of the semester.

Purpose of course

SOWK 455: Social Work Practicum

The practicum experience is designed to give students agency exposure that permits them to build on coursework by integrating and utilizing knowledge, skills, theories, and values that are applied in generalist social work practice. One of the primary purposes is to allow students contact with individuals, families, groups, organizations or communities involved with social service delivery (as practitioners and clients) who are distinguished by race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental disability, age, and national origin, in order to learn how to provide services adequately. Students will be able to acknowledge the impact of global social services that affect rural social service delivery.

SOWK 450: Integrative Seminar

The purpose of seminar is to help students clarify and integrate practicum issues and experiences with theoretical knowledge and the values of the profession. Seminar is a place to discuss how and when it is appropriate to intervene at micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Seminar is a safe place for students to confront and learn to deal with the social injustices within the social service system. Seminar will explore the ethical considerations of an intervention and non-intervention. Seminar is designed to be collaborative; therefore students will be required to participate by sharing their experiences. It is only through this sharing that the value of practicum experiences is realized. Students will be expected to utilize Seminar as an environment to demonstrate the completion of the CSWE Competencies and Behaviors.

Course learning objectives

SOWK 455: Social Work Practicum and SOWK 450, Integrative Seminar

The student will take a more self-directive role during the practicum experience. It is not expected that the student will have all the knowledge and skills to complete the practicum outcomes at the beginning of the semester, but that the student will seek out opportunities as appropriate to access and acquire knowledge, skills, values, and cognitive and affective processes. The objectives of SOWK 455: Practicum directly relate to, and rely on, the successful completion of the field practicum in addition to materials and information presented in SOWK 450: Integrative Seminar.

The list below of knowledge, skills, values, and cognitive and affective processes are a more specific statement of the BSSW Program’s Competencies and Behaviors. The faculty believe that each student will have mastered these outcomes by the end of their academic career at Minnesota State University, Mankato. Students will be asked to demonstrate mastery of these competencies and behaviors through documentation in the seminar assignments, facilitation in seminar classes, as a part of the Learning Contract and tasks in practicum.

Course Learning Outcomes

The outcomes of this course directly relate to and rely on the successful completion of the field practicum in addition to materials and information presented in seminar. Below are the course outcomes followed by the CSWE Competencies and Behaviors:

  1. Prepares competent professional generalist social work practitioners for work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. [Competencies 1-9, All Behaviors]
  2. Promotes identification with the social work profession and commitment to the profession’s values and ethics that guide practice. [Competency 1, Behaviors A-E]
  3. Values human well-being and advocates for human rights through social, economic, and environmental justice. [Competency 2, Behaviors A-C, Competency 3, Behaviors A & B, Competency 5, Behaviors A-C]
  4. Develops critical thinkers as resourceful problem-solvers that analyze and respond to diverse global contexts. [Competency 2, Behaviors A-C, Competency 3, Behaviors A-E, Competency 4, Behaviors A-C, Competency 5, Behaviors A-C]
  5. Prepares graduates for social work careers and life-long learning through a strong liberal arts foundation. [Competencies 1-9, All Behaviors]
  6. Supports the profession and communities at large through consultation, scholarship, research, and leadership. [Competencies 1-9, All Behaviors]

SOWK 450 and SOWK 455 assignments leading to capstone completion

Social Work 450 and Social Work 455 provide the opportunity to demonstrate the accomplishment of the Departmental goals. Successful participation in both, along with the completion of the requisite assignments, is designed to function as the program Capstone as required by the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Practicum and seminar assignments are given to the student by the field seminar liaison, agency field instructor, or a designated agency person to achieve the aforementioned Departmental competencies and behaviors. These may include reading, observation, seminars, training sessions, and or other educational opportunities that arise. Students are required to complete all assignments in an organized, professional, and timely manner. Incomplete assignments may result in the delay of the completion of practicum and graduation

Learning Contract

Each student will complete a Learning Contract and Evaluation Matrix (LC&E), in consultation with the field instructor and field seminar liaison, which establishes goals and individualized objectives to structure the practicum experience and to assess the student’s accomplishments. The LC&E is developed during the first two to three weeks of practicum. The LC&E will provide specific educational learning opportunities to demonstrate mastery of the nine (9) core competencies at the micro, mezzo and macro levels. It is the student responsibility to get this document completed for review and submitted for approval and evaluation by due dates. The document may be amended during the semester upon agreement with the Field Instructor and Field Seminar Liaison. The LC&E will be completed and submitted on SONIA.

Evaluation and Grades

SOWK 450, Integrative Seminar and SOWK 455, Social Work Practicum is a Pass or No Credit grade. Although the Field Director is responsible for determining the final grade of each student in practicum, communication with the field seminar liaison and agency field instructor and/or other agency personnel is also an integral part of determining that grade.

Grading is based on the following:

  • Completion of seminar & practicum assignments.
  • Attendance and participation in seminar and at practicum site.
  • Completion of Midterm Evaluation.
  • Completion of Final Evaluation achieving benchmark.

MSW POLICIES AND INTEGRATION OF PRACTICUM AND SEMINAR

Seminar attendance and participation policy

Integration of Field Courses

SOWK 665 and SOWK 675 assignments leading to capstone completion

Learning contract

Evaluations and Grades

 

Seminar attendance and participation policy

Attendance and participation are mandatory for all seminar activities, either on campus or scheduled online. As it is at the field agency, your presence matters. The expectation is that you will be present, on time, and prepared to work in seminar. The only absences that are excused are for hazardous weather, medical, or legal reasons and documentation from a doctor, attorney, or judge must be provided for the latter two. An unexcused absence is defined as any reason for absence outside of those stated in the previous sentence. Students are expected to attend the entire seminar. A pattern of late attendance or leaving early will count toward missed classes. Excessive absence in field seminar is defined as more than one unexcused absence per semester. Excessive absence will result in a No Credit grade. Students should communicate directly with the Field Seminar Instructor about any absences.

Integration of Field Courses

Foundation practicum & seminar I/II: SOWK 615/625

Purpose of course

SOWK 615 Foundation Practicum & Seminar I will allow students the opportunity to integrate social work theory and practice knowledge, skills, ethics and values through generalist social work direct practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and/or communities. In addition, students will apply the social work theory and practice knowledge, skills, ethics and values learned at a foundation level to engage in culturally competent direct social work practice with people representing diversity of age, class, culture, disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, marital status, national origin, race, religion, and sexual orientation. Each student will work with the Field Director to locate agencies with opportunities for master&s level practice and supervision corresponding with their learning goals.

Foundation Practicum & Seminar I is required for all students admitted with traditional standing to the MSW program. Students will be placed in agencies, for a total of 460 hours during the spring and summer semesters, that can provide appropriate practice experiences and supervision. Students are expected to apply the generalist practice perspective to their experiences with individual clients, families, groups, agencies, and/or communities while in their practicum setting. Seminar will provide additional hours for students to share their practicum experiences and challenges with their student colleagues for problem-solving, consultation, feedback, and support.  

SOWK 625 Foundation Practicum & Seminar II is required for all students admitted with traditional standing to the MSW program who have successfully completed or received an “IP” grade for SOWK 615 Foundation Practicum & Seminar I.  Students will continue their placement in the same agency as in SOWK 615 totaling 460 hours during spring and summer semesters. Students are expected to continue to apply the generalist social work practice perspective to their experiences with individual clients, families, groups, agencies, and/or communities while in their practicum setting.  SOWK 625 will provide on-going problem-solving, consultation, feedback, and support for students as they complete their 460 hours in practicum.  SOWK 625 expectations are similar to that of SOWK 615 and will require students to be active participants in field, in the classroom (both in person and online), and with assignments.

Place in MSW curriculum

SOWK 615 Foundation Practicum & Seminar I is taken in the spring semester (5 credits) followed by SOWK 625 Foundation Practicum & Seminar II in the summer semester (5 credits).  Students must have completed the first semester foundation coursework SOWK 601 Foundation of Generalist Practice, SOWK 605 Social Welfare Policy and Services, and SOWK 609 Culturally Responsive Communication in Social Work Practice with a grade of B or above prior to enrollment. Foundation Practicum & Seminar I builds on first semester course work and draws on concurrent enrollment with SOWK 611 Macro Social Work Practice and Theory and SOWK 603 Human Behavior in the Social Environment for information and opportunities for application in the field practicum setting.

SOWK 625 Foundation Practicum & Seminar II is taken in the summer semester (5 credits).  This course is a continuation of SOWK 615 and SOWK 629 Applied Social Work Research.

Course objectives **currently being revised

The focus of SOWK 615/625 is to develop generalist social work behaviors; these are displayed through practice in the field practicum setting. Field practicum experience is then strengthened through seminar sessions and assignments. The learning objectives of SOWK 615/625 ensure that CSWE Competencies are met through the practicum process. The knowledge, values, skills and cognitive/affective processes are reflected in the behaviors are evaluated through field practicum, and then strengthened through field instruction, assignments, and discussions in seminar. Given consistent attendance, regular participation, completion of seminar assignments and completion of the learning contract in field practicum, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior. (Comp 1)
  2. Engage in Diversity and Difference in Practice. (Comp2)
  3. Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice. (Comp 3)
  4. Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice. (Comp 4)
  5. Engage in Policy Practice. (Comp 5)
  6. Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organization and Communities. (Comp 6)
  7. Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. (Comp 7)
  8. Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities. (Comp 8)
  9. Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities. (Comp 9)
Advanced practicum & seminar I/II: SOWK 665/675

Purpose of course

SOWK 665/675 is designed to offer students the opportunity for direct and indirect evidence-based practice with increasingly more advanced practice situations, to emphasize advanced practice in the small and rural context as appropriate, and to recognize opportunities for leadership in both direct and indirect practice. In practicum settings students draw on all courses and take initiative to apply advanced knowledge, skills, and ethical principles in their contact with client populations, colleagues, and communities. This requires the use of critical thinking, increasing responsibility for application of advanced theories and methodology, and for assuming leadership as appropriate to create change opportunities in both direct and indirect practice. Practice occurs under the supervision of a MSW-prepared social worker that functions as a Field Instructor. One of the primary purposes of this practicum is to provide student contact with individuals, families, groups, organizations or communities who are involved with the social service delivery system and are distinguished by race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental disability, age, and national origin. This will serve to sensitize students to the practice issues germane to these client groups, to learn how to provide services adequately, and to develop collegial relationships with a diverse group of practitioners.

Seminar is the integrative component of the course that promotes the open discussion of students’ experiences with their student-colleagues from the perspective of various practice settings. The purpose of seminar is to help students reflect on their experiences within the field agency, and to clarify and integrate theoretical and practice curriculum content in practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Professional development, application of coursework, and issues related to populations at risk and clients distinguished by race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender or sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental disability, age and national origin, will be addressed through case presentation and discussion (face to face and/or on-line). Students will explore the ethical considerations of social justice, intervention and non-intervention in a supportive and collaborative setting.

Place in MSW curriculum

Students in SOWK 665/SOWK675, Advanced Practicum & Seminar I/II must have successfully completed their first year of the MSW program OR have been admitted as Advanced Standing. Successful completion of the first semester of the Specialization year is required for all students. Students take SOWK 665/SOWK 675 during the final two semesters of the Specialization year. Students complete concurrent coursework during the spring semester (SOWK 660 – Advanced Practice with Couples and Families) and summer semester (SOWK 661 – Social Work Program Planning and Administration).

Course objectives**currently being revised

The focus of SOWK 665/675 is to develop advanced generalist social work behaviors; these are displayed through practice in the field practicum setting. Field practicum experience is then strengthened through seminar sessions and assignments. The learning objectives of SOWK 665/675 ensure that CSWE Competencies are met through the practicum process. The knowledge, values, skills and cognitive/affective processes are reflected in the behaviors that are evaluated through field practicum, and then reinforces through field instruction, seminar discussions and assignments. Given consistent attendance, regular participation, and completion of assignments in seminar and the learning contract in field practicum, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior. (Comp 1)
  2. Engage in Diversity and Difference in Practice. (Comp 2)
  3. Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice. (Comp 3)
  4. Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice. (Comp 4)
  5. Engage in Policy Practice. (Comp 5)
  6. Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organization and Communities. (Comp 6)
  7. Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities. (Comp 7)
  8. Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities. (Comp 8)
  9. Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities. (Comp 9)

SOWK 665 and SOWK 675 assignments leading to capstone completion

SOWK 665 and SOWK 675 provide the opportunity to demonstrate the accomplishment of the Departmental goals. Successful participation in both, along with the completion of the requisite assignments, is designed to function as the program Capstone as required by the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences and College of Graduate Studies.

Practicum and seminar assignments will be given to the student by the Field Director, Field Instructor, or a designated agency person to achieve the aforementioned Departmental competencies and behaviors. These may include reading, observation, seminars, training sessions, and or other educational opportunities that arise. Students are required to complete all assignments in an organized, professional, and timely manner. Incomplete assignments may result in the delay of the completion of practicum and graduation.

Learning contract

Within the first four (4) weeks of the Spring semester, a Learning Contract and Evaluation Matrix (LC&E) will be developed by the student, in collaboration with the Field Instructors and Field Seminar Liaison. The LC&E will provide specific educational learning opportunities to demonstrate mastery of the nine (9) competencies at the micro, mezzo and macro levels. It is the student responsibility to get this document completed for review and submitted for approval and evaluation by due dates. The document may be amended during the semester upon agreement with the Field Instructor and Field Seminar Liaison. The LC&E will be completed and submitted on SONIA.

Evaluations and Grades

Students will be evaluated based on their LC&E at midterm and final. The same LC&E Matrix will be used for each of those evaluations. At the final evaluation, the student will be responsible to make sure that the document is completed on SONIA, including signatures submitted by the Field Instructor [and the off-site MSW Field Instructor if applicable], to the Field Seminar Liaison by final due date.

SOWK 615/625 or SOWK 665/675 is a Pass or No Credit Grade. Although the MSW Field Director/Field Seminar Liaison are responsible for determining the final grade, communication with the agency field instructor and/or other agency personnel is also an integral part of determining the final grade.

Grading is based on the following:

  • Completion of seminar & practicum assignments.
  • Attendance and participation in seminar and at practicum site.
  • Completion of Midterm Evaluation.
  • Completion of Final Evaluation achieving benchmark.

A grade of &rsquoIn Progress’ will be given at the end of SOWK 615 or SOWK 665. If a student receives an the overall midterm rating is below a 3 and/or there is a presence of an item rating of 0, they will be required to submit a written plan for remediation. The remediation plan must be approved by the Field Instructor, Field Seminar Liaison and Field Director in order for the student to move on to SOWK 625 or SOWK 675. At the conclusion of SOWK 625 or 675 a students must then earn a “Pass” in order to pass SOWK 615 or SOWK 675. A grade of “No Credit” at the end of SOWK 625 or SOWK 675 will result in a “No Credit” grade for SOWK 615 or SOWK 675.

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FIELD CHALLENGES, RESOLUTION, AND TERMINATION

CHALLENGES AND SUPPORT

PROCEDURES FOR ADDRESSING DIFFICULTIES

 

CHALLENGES AND SUPPORT

Field Education is one of the most rewarding and challenging parts of a student’s learning experience. It is the expectation that the field instructor create an enriching and supportive educational environment in order to address challenges. It is the expectation of the field seminar liaison to provide guidance and support to the field instructor and student to successful navigate these learning opportunities. At first these difficulties can appear to be insurmountable, but they can be resolved successfully if they are addressed early in the placement. It is a key objective in social work to recognize challenges that occur in relationships and to work towards resolution. When these challenges occur, the expectation is that the field instructor and student should meet and resolve the concern. The field seminar liaison should be notified by the student and/or field instructor of the concern in order to monitor the situation and provide support.

Situations occasionally develop that require a placement be changed once the semester has begun. Disruptions to field placements are infrequent and changes in placement will only be considered under unusual or extenuating circumstances. Examples include significant life events, agency disruptions and serious impediments, and student impairments that interfere with the professional judgement, performance, or jeopardize the best interest of those whom the social work student is responsible. No student can change or terminate field practicum placement without consultation with field seminar liaison.

PROCEDURES FOR ADDRESSING DIFFICULTIES

If there is no resolution to the concern then a formal review process can be initiated at the request of the field instructor, field seminar liaison, or the student. Placement agencies and the field program have the right to immediately terminate a student from field practicum when the student has acted egregiously such as, but not limited to, professional misconduct, violation of NASW Code of Ethics, etc. Once a student has been terminated from field placement, the student loses all accumulated hours. Otherwise the formal process will occur as follows:

  • Level 1: Field Remediation Plan
    1. The field seminar liaison will consult with both the field instructor and student regarding the concern. The field director will be notified of the concern.
    2. The field seminar liaison initiate a meeting with field instructor and student (may include the Field Director as needed).
    3. The field seminar liaison will make recommendations, and all parties will develop a remediation plan with a given timeline for concerns to be resolved.
      1. If the concern is resolved by the time frame and there are no further problems the situation is considered no longer an issue.
      2. If the concern is not resolved, continues, and/or intensifies then the situation is taken to a level 2 review.
  • Level 2: Academic Plan
    1. The field seminar liaison will notify the field director that student has not made significant progress on remediation plan and is at risk of receiving a grade of “No Credit”.
    2. The field director will initiate a meeting with field seminar liaison and student to discuss academic options. A written letter will be provided to the student following the meeting.
  • Level 3: Termination from Field Practicum
    1. The field director will notify the student that they are receiving a grade of “No Credit” (NC).
    2. The field director will notify the BSSW/MSW Program Director of failing grade

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